October 31, 2012

Grambling High School Day is Saturday!

By Ariel Bettis
Grambling State University Media Bureau

Grambling State University will educate and entertain future college students during its annual High School Day on Saturday. Students from Dallas, Houston, Lake Charles and Shreveport as well as Grambling, Ruston and Monroe are expected to attend.

"Students should expect a fun, safe environment," said Edward Scott, assistant director of admissions and head of the university’s recruitment service center. "They should expect to see exactly what the university has to offer, academically and socially…"

Grambling State has hosted a high school day event for more than 20 years. The day starts early, at 7 a.m. After registering, students will take a campus bus tour then hear about academics, social life and student government. University department heads, professors and students will welcome students and give them a preview of what college life will be like. 

The day’s activities include learning about the university’s career and course offerings, meeting the president of the Student Government Association and Miss Grambling, hearing the school’s marching band and watching the cheer squad. Students will get a special treat when the campus-based Black Dynasty Modeling Troupe performs.

After lunch, the students will attend the 2 p.m. football game between Grambling’s G-Men and the Jackson State University Tigers.

Though this is the university’s “High School Day,” Scott said the event is “open to the general public; it’s just named high school day."

"You’ll actually have students coming from community colleges, you’ll have grade-school kids and alumni," he added.

The recruitment service center expects between 1,200 and 1,500 people to participate as they get to know Grambling and its people.

“One thing that makes an Historically Black College and University unique is that we are allowed the opportunity to interact with the president, touch the vice president and ask them questions, personally,” said Scott. He said the provost, Connie Walton, will be on hand.

Registration, which includes lunch and the game, is $35 per person. Registration will be held in T.H. Harris Auditorium. For more information, contact Scott at scotte@gram.edu or Latari Fleming at flemingl@gram.edu.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

Students Learn Professional Etiquette to Get Ahead

Knowing when, where to place a fork, knife can make a difference

By Trent Brown
Grambling State University Media Bureau

Johnny Patterson wants students to taking eating properly seriously. “You can lose a job if you don’t know what fork to pick up,” he said.

As part of an ongoing effort to prepare Grambling State University students for the business world, Patterson and the university’s Office of Career Development and Placement Services hosted an etiquette dinner Tuesday night. Patterson, the office director, said the goal was to help students polish their skills so they can better present themselves during important interviews that might involve meals.

Patterson stressed the importance of appropriate etiquette as well as proper behavior and attire when it comes to business events. “More and more employers are asking applicants to dinner to mingle with them in a social setting,” added Denesia Lofton, a career counselor and the event coordinator who started the event in the spring. “We want our students to get comfortable sitting down with an employer.”

Etiquette expert Linda Montgomery walked from table to table greeting students before the dinner program started, giving them samples of how to meet and greet in a professional, business-like manner. During her talk, Montgomery told students to always know where they are going, and know how long it takes to get there, so they can arrive on time. “Always leave few minutes ahead of time in case of a unexpected problem,” she said.

Getting down to more serious etiquette business, Montgomery taught students about the proper dinner place settings and dinner service. She said in an interview that she wants students to immediately “feel comfortable particular in dining situations” because social etiquette skills will give them a competitive edge in the business world.

Some of her key tips during the program at the Eddie G. Robinson Museum included:

  • before the meal, always use common courtesies such as “please” and “thank you”
  • when done with the meal, do not push plates aside or stack them on top of each other
  • place the knife and fork side by side on the plate, pointing to the 10 o’clock and 4 o’clock positions as if facing a clock
  • always remember to thank the host

Montgomery was trained at The Protocol School of Washington, an accredited protocol and etiquette school in the nation’s capital. She is an etiquette expert in the area, giving media interviews as well as public speaking and planning conferences and special events.  “We wanted to invite somebody who has a reputation, and she brings the knowledge and skills …,” said Patterson.

Students had a chance to practice what they were learning as they enjoyed roasted chicken, glazed carrots, steamed asparagus and bread pudding. They talked about their desired careers and Montgomery talked about how to avoid social networking mistakes, especially on Facebook.

The etiquette expert shared ideas about how to make small talk and how to mingle at professional receptions.  They were given etiquette booklets to take home so that they could brush up before their next professional dining experience.

Damilola Dade, an 18-year-old freshman economics major from Nigeria, said she will take what she learned at the event and use it.

 “I knew I was going to learn a lot,” said Dade, who needed to be convinced to attend. “I persuaded myself to come.”

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

October 30, 2012

Tribute to GSU’s Collie J. Nicholson

By Erina Love
Grambling State University Media Bureau

Collie J. NicholsonTo much of the world he was known as “The Man with the Golden Pen.” People around Grambling State University knew him as “Nic.”

Collie J. Nicholson, the man some credit with making Grambling a household name and starting the highly anticipated Bayou Classic, recently had an alumni chapter named after him.

“Our goal for the Collie J. Nicholson Chapter of Grambling University National Alumni Association is to make Grambling visible in the North Dallas area,” said Kimberly Page, president of the chapter that was founded in October 2009. “After reading the contributions that Nicholson made to Grambling, it was apparent that we had parallel visions with his being on a higher spectrum.”

Ophelia Nicholson was pleased to hear that the chapter had been named after her husband, who died in 2006. "Collie J. played an integral part in branding the name Grambling State University by his promotions and publicity,” said Nicholson, who lives in Shreveport. “Acts like this will keep his legacy visible for future Gramblinites to know. Never forget those who helped to make GSU a household word.”

Honoree “Nic” began his legacy with Grambling in 1947, working for more than 30 years as the university’s sports information director and as the director of publications, until he retired in 1978.
While working with Grambling’s sports teams, Nicholson was responsible for providing statistics, team and player notes and other information about the university’s athletics to the general public and the media.

He did that, and more.

Nicholson made sure people knew where Grambling was, and what was going on at what was then known as Grambling College. He set up games for the football team, games that many thought would be impossible. The historic games played in Japan and at Yankee Stadium in New York City were due to Nicholson’s diligence. He was instrumental in organizing the first televised performance of the school’s marching band, which helped brand the band as the “World Famed Marching at the 1964 American League National Football Championship game. He was also responsible for the band’s appearance at the first AFL-NFL Super Bowl game in 1967, a match between the Green Bay Packers and Kansas City Chiefs.

“If it was not for Collie G. Nicholson having the contacts he had, you probably would have never seen the Grambling band being televised at that time,” stated Edwin Thomas, an assistant band director and associate professor of industrial and engineering technology. “We might not even be what we are today if it wasn’t for him.”

Some say Nicholson was ahead of his time. With all of today’s technology, getting information out to the mass media takes only a few clicks. However, without today’s tools, Nicholson told Grambling’s story across the nation and elsewhere in the world. One of the greatest things he did was start the Bayou Classic in 1974. The Bayou Classic, a football game that continues this fall in the Louisiana Super Dome. The game is televised annually by NBC every last Saturday in November, just two days after Thanksgiving.

“Growing up, anybody who knew anything about Grambling knew that Collie J. Nicholson put GSU on the map,” Jon Moss, a Grambling alum who manages the state-owned Eddie G. Robinson Museum on the university’s campus.

In a fitting tribute to the chapter’s namesake, the North Dallas chapter is hosting its annual Bayou Classic Watch Party/World AIDS Day event on November 24th at Dodie’s Cajun Restaurant (4812 Belt Line Road, Addison 75254) starting at noon. Those interested in the chapter or its watch party can contact Page at president@GSUCJNDallas.com.

Collie J. Nicholson and Coach Eddie G. Robinson.

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Additional Coverage:

Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

October 26, 2012

GSU 2012 Homecoming Reflections

Ebony T. Myers
Grambling State University Media Bureau

The atmosphere was filled with excitement and laughter as thousands of alumni, supporters, and students came together at Grambling State University to support the annual homecoming game and festivities.

“When I come back it feels like I’m back in school,” said Jessie Jackson, a 1977 graduate who majored in sociology and political science.

Alumni come back to their old stomping grounds for a variety of reasons. One of the most common reasons is to rekindle old friendships that were once strong while in college.

Jennifer Smith, a Detroit native and a 1997 graduate of the mass communication department said, “I love being back. I remember so many wonderful relationships I often forget about. The school gave us so much and it our time for us to give back.”

Elroy Combs, a Gibson, La., native who works as a Pepsico general manager in Austin, Texas, said he was pleased with “the modernization of the campus.” Landon Williams, a 1992 criminal justice graduate, also complimented the university administration on the campus improvements. The former G-Men baseball player said he likes how the campus has been spruced up.

For Marion Rushing-Robinson of Shreveport, seeing improvements has a personal connection. “I see improvements and expansion of the campus,” said Rushing-Robinson, a 1993 early childhood education graduate. “It shows that money I donate to the school is spent on benefitting the students.”

The university relies on contributions from a variety of sources to help fund needs, including updating and improving existing buildings, academic scholarships and campus beautification. Without the donations, Grambling State would not be the same. That’s where alums, friends and supporters come in.

Robert Clark, a Monroe native considers himself a “fervent” giver. He stressed that he is very impressed with the campus growth and the look of the campus. Clark, who attended Grambling, said he recently gave an endowment to the university because he believes in the mission of the school.

Thomas Jones, the president of a local alumni chapter and an alum who gives, said, “I love coming back. Grambling has come a long way. The improvements have made Grambling more competitive as a university.”

Grambling President Frank G. Pogue recently launched a fundraising campaign, asking alumni to give at least $1,000 between the 2012 homecoming and the 2013 homecoming. He received several checks during the homecoming activities, including at Saturday’s game at Robinson Stadium. Pogue had giving promises, too.

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Additional Information

Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

October 24, 2012

GSU will soon offer a 100 percent online collaborative degree

By Erina Love
Grambling State University Media Bureau

Grambling State University will soon offer a 100 percent online collaborative degree, helping those who have started but not finish college to earn a bachelors in organizational leadership.

 “The main purpose of the program is to bring back students who have earned some college credit but never completed the requirements for a degree,” Rama Tunuguntla, interim dean of the College of Professional Studies at the university.

Tunuguntla worked with Grambling Provost Connie Walton to develop the degree program for Grambling, and to coordinate the effort with the other eight University of Louisiana System universities across the state. Other ULS universities in the area include Louisiana Tech University and the University of Louisiana at Monroe.

The collaborative degree launches in early 2013. The program will launch early in 2013. Each campus will have a specific focus. Grambling State’s concentration will be human relations.

Tunuguntla said the university recognizes that students undergo a variety of life-changing events that prevents them from receiving their degree, and would like to offer this program in hopes of changing that.

To be qualified for the program, students must have completed 60 hours of college credit, including general education courses, and must be at least 25 years old. The degree is designed to make a degree easier for people want to continue their education but do not have the time to travel to campus courses.  Returning students will take courses across the system and choose a university for a concentration.

 “We are happy to be apart of this nine-institution degree offering,” said Frank G. Pogue, Grambling’s president. “We have a number of Gramblinites who, for a variety of reasons, have gone on with their lives without completing their degrees…

“We are also pleased to provide a human relations management emphasis as a part of this effort, especially because human relations management is an important area in corporate and non-profit management, and one in great need of more diversity.”

For students who have not been able to complete 60 hours or more, there will be opportunities to pursue the degree. The program will be offered in five, eight-week sessions for $325 per credit hour. The program can be completed in two years.
“This is an excellent opportunity for students who dropped out sometime back. This program will help students promote their career opportunities in a variety of areas,” added Tunuguntla.

The degree program was approved Tuesday by the system Board of Supervisors in Baton Rouge.  Learn more at http://www.ulsystem.net/index.cfm?md=newsroom&tmp=detail&articleID=474

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Additional Information

Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

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