April 29, 2014

GSU Data, Planning Officer Leaves for Wisconsin

Nettie Daniels, a Mississippi native and Alcorn State grad, heads to Wisconsin to start an institutional effectiveness and assessment unit

Nettie Daniels, the university's planning officer in charge of all data and GSU facts, is leaving for another opportunity.
Nettie Daniels, the university’s planning officer in charge of
all data and GSU facts, is leaving for another opportunity.

BY NINFA SAAVEDRA
Grambling State University Media Bureau

GRAMBLING, LA — After several years of service under two Grambling State University presidents, Nettie Daniels, the university’s planning officer in charge of all data and GSU facts, is leaving for another opportunity.

The Mississippi native who has worked in a Louisiana system office will be departing for the Midwest after her last day at Grambling State University on June 30.

“I have accepted an offer from the University of Wisconsin–Platteville as executive director of the office of institutional effectiveness and assessment,” said Daniels, an Alcorn State University alumna.

This next professional career challenge gives Daniels the opportunity to create a planning office from scratch. She will hire a staff and centralize the university’s data reporting, institutional effectiveness and assessment efforts at the 8,700-student university, which is gearing up for a regional accreditation visit in 2016.

“Developing an office of institutional effectiveness and assessment at UWP will not be the first time I established such an office,” said Daniels. “I have nearly 30 years of experience in planning, assessment and effectiveness and I look forward to continuing my career at UWP.”

Daniels arrived at GSU after working at the University of Louisiana System as a staff member in Baton Rouge.  She had worked at the system office as associate vice president for institutional research, planning and evaluation for five years when Grambling State University asked her to consider GSU.

“The offer came at the right time for me, so I accepted the challenge to help prepare the university for an upcoming … review,” recalled Daniels, noting that the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) Commission on Colleges (COC) was reviewing the academic and other standards at GSU.

The 2000 SACS review had five recommendations specific to the university’s office of planning and research. With Daniels’ leadership, the 2010 review ended with zero recommendations. “It was one of my biggest achievements,” recalled Daniels. “It’s no small matter to work with our dedicated staff, turning over every concern, any possible issue, to make sure that we had no problems.”

During her tenure at GSU, Daniels served as the associate vice president for planning and institutional research from 2005-2012 and as associate vice president of the office of institutional planning, assessment and effectiveness from 2012-2014. Daniels and her staff have been responsible for planning presidential retreats, coordinating the development and implementation of the university’s five-year strategic plan and monitoring the assessment of strategic goals and objectives.

Some may not realize she has held an unofficial, special role with GSU President Frank G. Pogue.

"Nettie has been more than a planning officer to me. She’s been a trusted adviser and someone with whom I can talk about university as well as system operations and policies because she’s done some of it all,” said Pogue. “I wish her good luck as she leaves Louisiana and heads north to Wisconsin, and I hope the University of Wisconsin realizes that they’ve stolen a superb professional who will elevate them to new levels."

Daniels said she will miss a lot about GSU, especially her staff, a superb leader in Pogue and the great working relationship with her colleagues she has gained over the past 10 years since she has lived in Northern Louisiana.

She leaves with beneficial professional experiences. Added Daniels, “GSU has taught me that patience and persistence are key factors to success.”

Photo Credit:  GLENN LEWIS/Grambling State University Media Bureau.

Click here for PDF.

###

Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

April 25, 2014

GSU, Coach Rob Museum Chosen for National Museum

GSU brings international sports reputation, especially with its football legacy, and the Eddie G. Robinson Museum is the only HBCU museum of its kind

Elaine Nicholas, the National Museum of African American History and Culture's senior curator of culture, visits GSU/Robinson Museum.
Elaine Nicholas, the National Museum of African American History and
Culture’s senior curator of culture, visits GSU/Robinson Museum.

By TIERRA SMITH
Grambling State University Media Bureau

GRAMBLING, LA — Grambling State University will be featured in the National Museum of African American History and Culture when it opens in Washington, D.C., in spring 2016.

"Having a space in a prominent museum like the new National Museum of African American History and Culture just for Grambling State will bring more attention to GSU and its students and alumni,” said Frank G. Pogue, the university president. “I look forward to visiting Washington, D.C., to see it after the museum opens."

The museum is the only national museum devoted solely to documenting the history and culture of African Americans. “(It) will tell the American story through the lens of the African American experience,” said Elaine Nicholas, the museum’s senior curator of culture during a recent (April 16) visit to the GSU campus. “Eleven exhibits will tell those stories using ionic artifacts.”

Grambling State, with a primary focus on its legendary football program, will be joined by a section featuring longtime GSU head football coach Eddie G. Robinson, the winningest coach in NCAA Division I football. In addition, there will be an area dedicated to the Bayou Classic.

“Grambling history has not only influenced HBCU sports but other collegiate and professional sports,” said Damion Thomas, an assistant professor of kinesiology at the University of Maryland College Park and the museum’s curator.

Nicholas and Thomas, who are actively involved with the production of the museum, toured Grambling State campus and the Eddie G. Robinson Museum as a part of a visit to determine which objects might best represent the school, the museum and the Bayou Classic. The visitors said they got a great sense of Grambling State tradition, Robinson’s lasting legacy, the people and community.

“One of the main goals today was to start the conversation about the objects needed to tell Grambling’s story,” said Thomas. With the help of Pogue, he and others worked with Wilbert Ellis, a former GSU baseball coach and president of the Friends of The Eddie G. Robinson Museum, and the Robinson family to identify some likely museum prospects, including some of Robinson’s playbooks and some of Coach Rob’s players’ jerseys worn by some of his most famous football players.

The national museum exhibit will include memorabilia from the Bayou Classic, the only HBCU classic football game that is televised nationally. “Out of all of the HBCU classics, the Bayou Classic is number one,” said Aaron James, the GSU athletic director.

“Bayou Classic is the Super Bowl of Classics,” added Dotti Belletto, president and CEO of NOCCI, the New Orleans-based company that manages the Bayou Classic for Grambling State University and Southern University. “These are traditions we want our children, and their children to experience. There has to be something that ties all of us together.”  Belletto said Pogue deserves a lot of credit for making this happen.

“Grambling State has a special place and a special role among all colleges and universities, including but not limited to HBCUs,” said Pogue, who hosted a small, private lunch for the visitors in the museum’s Doris Robinson Room. “This school is known across the state, across the region, across the nation and across the world.”

Since being established by the U. S. Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2003, the museum has collected 27,000 artifacts. The museum will cost $540 million to build, with half of the money being provided by the United States government and the other half raised by public-private partnerships.

Other historically black universities scheduled to be featured in the museum include Howard University, Southern University, Florida A&M, Tennessee State University, Tuskegee University and the annual Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association basketball tournament, commonly called the CIAA Basketball Tournament.

Elaine Nicholas tours the Robin Museum, to be featured in the new National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Elaine Nicholas tours the Robin Museum, to be featured in the new National Museum of African
American History and Culture.

Click here for PDF.

###

Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

GSU World Famed Alum Promoted to Marine Band Leader

GSU alum, Andres Navarro, has been promoted to the position of warrant officer of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing Band in San Diego, Calif.
GSU alum, Andres Navarro, has been promoted to
the position of warrant officer of the 3rd Marine
Aircraft Wing Band in San Diego, CA.

By DONTAVIUS MOORE
Grambling State University Media Bureau

Grambling, LA – One Grambling State University alumnus landed his dream job recently, and he said GSU played a significant role.

Andres Navarro has been promoted to the position of warrant officer of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing Band in San Diego, Calif. He holds the title as director of the band.

Navarro was in the Grambling State University World Famed Tiger Marching Band from 1997-2002. While in the band he played the French horn, bass guitar and piano.

"Andres was a superb musician and had raw talent that is very hard to find,” said Larry Pannell, GSU’s marching band director.

As he climbed the ranks in the GSU band, he became the head drum major of the band in the 2001-02 season. His talent was displayed in the 2002 film “Drumline” featuring actor Nick Cannon.

Navarro, 39, has been in the United States Military for 10 years. His band is broken down into five ensembles with a total of 52 members. He was promoted in 2013.

While playing the French horn at Stranahan High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, his band director, Israel Charles, encouraged him to attend Grambling State. Charles, also a GSU alum, is a part of Kappa Kappa Psi Fraternity Inc. and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc., as is Navarro.

Click here for PDF.

###

Additional Information:

Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

April 24, 2014

GSU Queen Competes in Ebony Contest

Grambling State University’s Ambra Brice, of Gibsland, is one of many HBCU campus queens seeking votes to be featured in the national magazine

Miss GSU, Ambra Brice, competes for votes in Ebony magazine contest.
Miss GSU, Ambra Brice, competes for votes
in Ebony magazine contest.

By E’VONNE GIPSON
Grambling State University Media Bureau

Grambling, LA – Miss Grambling State University 2013-2014 is one of many campus queens at historically black colleges and universities competing in a national magazine contest — and she wants votes.

There are over 100 HBCUs, but EBONY magazine publishes photographs and stories about only 10 HBCU queens based on the number of votes each gets. There are dozens of campus queens competing, and Brice, her royal court and the university are working hard to get one of the ten available slots in an upcoming issue of the magazine.

Hailing from Gibsland, La., Ambra Brice, ranked 10th as recently as a few days ago (Tuesday, April 22), wants to continue climbing to the top to better guarantee that she has the chance to represent Grambling State University.  

“I would like people to vote for me because I would love the opportunity to continue the legacy of representing GSU in the magazine,” said Brice, 22, a senior marketing major and experienced pageant winner. “It would be an honor to be the face that represents my HBCU in a positive way,”

Brice is no stranger to fierce competition. She served as GSU’s Miss Sophomore 2011-2012 and Miss Cover Girl 2012-2013.

Brice, who plans to become a marketing specialist and a business owner after working at CenturyLink in Monroe, La., cites several things as key for a campus queen, including “poise, great communication skills, and being able to understand your student body because if you understand your study body, and what they are expecting from their college experience, it is easier to represent them effectively.”

Those who want to help Brice win a coveted spot on Ebony’s Top Ten list can go to http://www.ebony.com/campusqueens/118/#axzz2zdl5825W to read about Brice, see her two-minute video and vote. Anyone can vote, and each person can vote as many times as possible each day. Voters can post on Facebook or tweet on Twitter to bring more attention, and votes, to Brice’s effort.

Campus Queen voting is sponsored by Nielsen, a global company that measures what consumers watch, buy and listen to online and otherwise. Ebony campus queen contest voting is open until May 16. Brice plans to be one of the winners featured in the September edition of Ebony. Those with a little more time can complete an online form and enter a weekly Nielsen sweepstakes drawing to win an Apple iPad Air.

Brice has a successful GSU campus queen example and good friend to rely on for encouragement. Miss GSU 2012-2013, Geralka Jackson, captured one of the top 10 spots in the Ebony contest last year. Jackson competed with a number of HBCU campus queens from Hampton University in Virginia, Florida A&M University in Florida, Jackson State University in Mississippi and elsewhere.

“I talk to Gerri almost every other day and she has been one of my friends, mentors, and support systems through this whole thing,” she said about her former roommate. “Seeing Gerri featured in the Ebony magazine last year and bringing positive light to GSU was my inspiration and encouragement that I could to do the same thing now that the crown has been passed on to me.”

Brice thinks she can win an Ebony spot in part because  “I attend a smaller university and I am from a smaller town, which makes being featured in the Ebony magazine not only a personal accomplishment, but a community accomplishment.”

Throughout her reign as queen Brice has focused on recruitment, being a symbol of hope and inspiring students to go to college and follow their dreams. She also believes being featured in Ebony will bring more attention to GSU, encouraging high school students to consider college and to put Grambling State University on their list of universities to consider.

“Many high school and college students read the Ebony magazine and will see me as a positive representation for GSU, and (it) will give them that extra push (and want) to attend,” Brice said.

Click here for PDF.

###

Additional Information:

Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

Pogue: Challenges Became Opportunities Yielding Success

Outgoing Grambling State University president takes time to reflect on his tenure in his “dream” job, leading an HBCU

President Pogue addresses the crowd and highlighs successes in his final convocation address before retirement.
President Pogue addresses the crowd and highlighs successes
in his final convocation address before retirement.

By JESSICA WRIGHT
Grambling State University Media Bureau

Grambling, LA – Frank G. Pogue delivered his last spring convocation address in T.H. Harris Auditorium, reminding an audience about the many accomplishments achieved during his tenure as Grambling State University’s president.

For about an hour, Pogue highlighted some of the institution’s more notable challenges as well as some lesser known issues, saying that those challenges were made opportunities for success.

“Grambling has always had challenges but even with those challenges GSU is doing fine,” said Pogue, as he stood alone at a podium at the center of the stage.

When Pogue signed on as a consultant, he had retired three times. After several weeks he agreed to sign up as interim president to help stabilize the university, getting a number of matters resolved and set up for the institution’s eighth president. In December 2009, Pogue became that president. On June 30 he retires.

Working with his administration leadership team, he identified 10 priorities and established strategic initiatives designed to successfully achieve the mission of the institution. Pogue used his last GSU convocation to share a list of actions and successes, some of which not only met but exceeded expectations.

“Alumni lost faith in our ability to manage resources and we turned it around… the financial audit completed in 2012 by the State Legislative Auditors was issued with zero findings,” said Pogue. During his time at Grambling he has encountered budget cuts twice a year in each of his years as president. Since missing or unallocated property was a major repeat finding Grambling brought on board an experienced legislative auditor as Comptroller. They have also implemented processes to align property to people and not just offices, making individuals accountable for university property and equipment.

Some other achievements noted by Pogue included stabilizing enrollment, keeping the total undergraduate and graduate student number around 5,000 students; increased retention rates and completion rates; increased fiscal accountability; met and exceeded LA GRAD Act performance targets; increased distance learning and online learning, including increasing the number of enrolled online students from 944 in 2009 to over 5,000 in fall 2012. Grambling State offers three degree programs fully online – a bachelor of arts in organizational leadership, a masters in criminal justice and a doctorate in  developmental education.

The president said he has enjoyed his time at Grambling State, especially seeing some of his ideas become reality. For instance, he said, he wanted a more beautiful, better manicured and clean campus – and that happened. In fact, he said, students, faculty and staff are taking it upon themselves and participating in campus beautification. “I look out and I see students pick up trash and walk it to the trash can instead of walking pass it,” said Pogue, noting that he sees that regularly when he looks outside his first-floor Long-Jones Hall window.

Pogue also emphasized the importance of giving back. He said the number of individual alumni donations rose from 1.3% of all alumni when he arrived to 12%, a big leap for any historically black college or university. Pogue suggested issuing piggy banks to new freshmen as they enter the university to promote and encourage donations to the university, and he said he thinks that has helped.

“There are challenges at every institution but we have worked hard to turn those challenges into opportunities for Grambling,” said Pogue, reflecting on his time at the institution.

Pogue plans to continue as a consultant at a consulting firm, helping colleges and universities identify, recruit and hire presidents. Along his wife, Dorothy, he will move back to their permanent home in Delaware to be closer to their daughter and two grandsons after ending his tenure at GSU.

Students, faculty and administrators are in attendence for Spring 2014 Convocation as Dr. Pogue provides his final convocation address before his retirement.
Students, faculty and administrators are in attendence for Spring 2014 Convocation as Dr. Pogue provides his final convocation address before his retirement.

Click here for PDF.

###

Additional Information:

Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress