February 26, 2013

Get Prepared for the ACT’s Math Test

High school students across northern Louisiana are encouraged to attend one of three math-focused ACT workshops to significantly improve math scores

GRAMBLING, LA – The Office of Service Learning at Grambling State University is sponsoring three mathematics ACT preparation workshops. There is no cost. High school students interested in going to college will gain vital information and study techniques that will help with the math portion of the ACT.

To ensure that students can gain easy access to the workshops, there will be three different locations.

The first workshop is March 2 in the Swartz area at Starlight Baptist Church’s fellowship hall, located at 1609 Highway 139 in Swartz, just outside of Monroe.  The session will start at 9 a.m. and end at 11 a.m.

There are two workshops available at different locations March 9. At the Jonesboro- Hodge Middle School, located at 440 Old Winnfield Road, the workshop will be held in the cafeteria at 9 a.m. and continue until 11 a.m.  Another workshop will be held from 10 a.m. until noon in Homer High School’s library, located at 1008 North Main in Homer.

To find out how these workshops can help you succeed postsecondary education and determine your college readiness, please contact Rory L. Bedford, PhD., at 318-274-2553 or 318-274-2547, or stop by his office in Charles P. Adams, Room 117, on Grambling State University’s campus.

Click here for PDF.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

February 22, 2013

Engineering “Bringing Dreams to Life”

By ALEXIA HINTON
Grambling State University Media Bureau

High school students from across northern Louisiana participated in various engineering contests, and some walked away with awards.

The Grambling State University College of Engineering held its 10th annual Clayton A. Wiley “Engineering Week” with activities on Monday, Tuesday and wrapped up the series of activities hosting high schoolers, proving tours of the engineering facility, the university campus and feeding them the university cafeteria with university officials and engineering faculty.

About 100 students from Ruston High School, Jonesboro High School and Carroll High School attended a day of creative brainstorming and competitions involving mechanical puzzles, electrical circuit design, bridge building design and a poster competition. Winners from each school received awards, even cash.

“I enjoyed the great turn out for today’s event,” said Colton Brown, an electrical mechanical lab technician. “The kids seemed motivated and I look forward to seeing an even bigger turn out in the future.”

The event honors Wiley, one of the founding members of the engineering department during the early 1950s. He was known as a student-oriented professor, and was responsible for the design of many buildings on campus. University Provost Connie Walton joined engineering graduate Eric Bowie and Tyrone Harris, owner of Harris Construction, each providing encouraging words. The day ended with a reception, including a hot buffet of catfish, a vegetable medley, green beans, rice pilaf and butter baked apple pie.

Daron Spence, president of the university’s National Society of Black Engineers chapter, added that he wants to see these students again, getting them interested in science, engineering, technology and math (STEM) research by exposing them to different aspects of science.

Lots of university students know the face and name of Johnny Patterson, who leads a lot of career services efforts. Many don’t know he was an engineer before he became a key student advisor, counselor and mentor to many as director of career services on campus. He was recognized for his contributions to the Department of Engineering, and he was lauded with gratitude for helping students succeed and numerous contributions. Patterson was a little surprised, and humbled.

“I am surprised that so many remembered,” he said. “It was nothing special or challenging.”

Photos:
Tyrone Harris of Harris Construction Company in Grambling delivers the keynote address during Engineering Week at Grambling State University.
 Tyrone Harris of Harris Construction Company in Grambling delivers the keynote address during Engineering Week at Grambling State University.

Dr. Shueh-Ji Lee (right), GSU industrial and engineering technology professor, offers advice to area high school students checking out an electronics laboratory in Grambling State University’s James Hall.
 Dr. Shueh-Ji Lee (right), GSU industrial and engineering technology professor, offers advice to area high school students checking out an electronics laboratory in Grambling State University’s James Hall.

Examining a bridge construction/design project during Engineering Week is Dr. Olusegun Adeyemi, head of the Grambling State University Industrial & Engineering Technology Department.
Examining a bridge construction/design project during Engineering Week is Dr. Olusegun Adeyemi, head of the Grambling State University Industrial & Engineering Technology Department.

Students from Carroll High School (Monroe), Jonesboro-Hodge High School and Ruston High School participate in an Engineering Week activity  held in James Hall at  Grambling State University.
 Students from Carroll High School (Monroe), Jonesboro-Hodge High School and Ruston High School participate in an Engineering Week activity  held in James Hall at  Grambling State University.

Spring 2013 Engineering Week Winners
Click here for Spring 2013 Engineering Week Winners PDF.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

February 19, 2013

Sheryl Lee Ralph visits GSU as Convocation Speaker

Actress, HIV activist Sheryl Lee Ralph visits Grambling State University as Black History Month Convocation Speaker

By ANDREA BEASLEY
Grambling State University

Award-winning actress Sheryl Lee Ralph will visit Grambling State University on Thursday, Feb. 28, as a part of the university’s Black History Month convocation.

Ralph is known for her ability to encourage and empower students and because the university has regularly invited “black males…we thought it would be nice to have a black female, especially because we see her as a positive role model,” said David C. Ponton, the university’s student activities dean.

Ralph, a self- proclaimed “diva,” will address the university community and the public during a 6 p.m. program at the T.H. Auditorium.  Ponton said in an interview that Ralph will talk about “where we come from to where we are now and where we will go.”

“I feel honored, because I would personally think she wouldn’t have time, but I want to see what she has to say…” said sophomore California native Markisha Roches, 19.
The legendary actress began her career on stage in the Tony Award-nominated play “Dreamgirls.” It was her role as Dee Mitchell on the highly-rated television series “Moesha” that labeled Ralph as one of television’s favorite moms.
“She was more easygoing than the dad, " recalled Shatiya Williams, 22, talking about Ralph’s character on the show. The Louisiana native said she is looking forward to seeing her in person.

Ralph’s visit is a part of the university’s Lyceum Series, a series of “cultural events that are put on by a committee that exposes students…to different things in our community and globally,” said Ponton, a Louisiana native.

The mother of two, Ralph, 56, is adamant about promoting for HIV/AIDS awareness, primarily through her global non-profit D.I.V.A. (Divinely Inspired Victoriously Aware) Foundation, has worked for 20 plus years to raise money for “resources and producing events that raise awareness and educate millions.”

Ralph’s most recent book is Redefining Diva: Life Lessons from the Original Dreamgirl. The personal memoir depicts her experiences as en entertainer and growing up as a young girl with a passion and determination to succeed.

Click here for Sheryl Lee Ralph Bio.
Click here for Flyer

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

Grambling State President’s Day Lunch a Success

By ERINA LOVE
Grambling State University Media Bureau

President Pogue addresses the crowd at the President's Day Lunch.As most students walked into Grambling State University’s McCall Dinning Hall for lunch Monday they were in for a pleasant surprise. To eliminate any middlemen or miscommunication, the university’s executive leadership team were sitting at tables to hear directly from students.

"I’ve never seen anything like this in all of my years, where administration, students and faculty sat together at lunch and directly discussed issues concerning the university," said Grambling State University President Frank G. Pogue, who sat with First Lady Dorothy Pogue, student organization leaders and other students in the center of the café.

As students ate lunch, vice presidents, deans, department heads and some faculty and staff asked students what about the good and bad at the university and what the institution can do to improve their tenure. Student comments were recorded on feedback forms.
The students had lots to say about various issues, including the university dress code, financial aid, the condition and hours of the library, campus security, admissions and registration.

"Students concerns will be more of a reality to (the) administration now that they’ve heard it first hand instead of second head through other mediums, (including) the Student Government Association," said SGA President Jonathan Allen, a senior business major.

"One of the problems with the university is that they implement little things that won’t make a big change, but they bypass the bigger issues that’ll make a greater difference," said Justin Owens, 21, a psychology major from Los Angeles.

It was apparent that other students were feeling the same as they gave short responses when it came to answering problems pertaining dress code; however, expressive conversations were sparked as they were asked about administration and financial aid issues.

"The students were very honest and forthright in speaking about issues that impact them, and we can only respect that because we want to make things better," said Willie Daniel, head of the kinesiology department.

"The event was great and a positive one,” added Terry Powman, a senior elementary education major from Houston. “I really hope that the administration really gets what we want, how we feel, and that we’re serious about these issues."

After an hour or so of feedback, Pogue thanked everyone and asked all involved to enjoy some red, white and blue Presidents Day cake and cupcakes.

"I really hoped for honest feedback about things that we can address so that we can develop an action plan that’ll address current and future concerns pertaining students," said Leon Sanders, vice president of finance and administration, who oversees buildings and facilities as well as finance.

Pogue and his executive leadership team quickly followed the first-time feedback lunch by discussing it at the president’s regularly scheduled Tuesday meeting. Pogue said the university used the Monday activity as another way to collect data and information as a part of a continuing effort to do what’s best for students. He said the feedback will be a part of the university’s spring planning, its April convocation and as an important part of the annual summer retreat.

Pogue said he was pleased with the event. "The only thing I regret is not doing this sooner,” he said.

Photos:
President & Mrs. Pogue sitting with student leaders.
Professor Daniels recording views and suggestions from students.
Mr. Britten working with students to discuss and address concerns.
Dean Wright discusses and records views of students.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

February 18, 2013

Grambling Theatre presents “Crumbs from the Table of Joy” February 19 – 22

Grambling State University Theatre to present Crumbs from the Table of Joy, by Lynn Nottage February 19-22, 2013 at the Floyd L. Sandle Theatre, located in the Conrad Hutchinson Performing Arts Center.

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Grambling State University is pleased to announce its third stage production of the 2012-2013 season, Crumbs from the Table of Joy, by Lynn Nottage, the Pulitzer Prize author of Ruined.  Set in Brooklyn in the 1950’s, the play centers around the life of Godfrey Crumb (played by Derek Rice), a widower trying to raise his two daughters, Earnestine (played by Ashley Lackey) and Ermina (played by Ashanti Spears), under the strict religious commandments of the controversial leader, Father Devine.  The arrival of Aunt Lily (played by Tatanesha Mincey), creates an up-roar to the practiced belief of no sex, alcohol or radio playing on Sundays.  Between raising teenage daughters and dealing with a Communistic drunken sister-in-law, Godfrey flees to the arms of Gerte (played by Kdeja Johnson), an innocent German immigrant, who he impulsively brings home.  The play has a talented cast that promises to tap into the spiritual and intellectual energy of Lynn Nottage’s Crumb from the Table of Joy

Directed by Karl V. Norman, the production staff includes Shaina Rogers as production stage manager and sound designer, Sean Turner as set constructer, Curtis Maxey as light designer, and Teshia Lincoln as costume designer.

Performances dates are February 19-22 and the show begins at 7pm.  Tickets are $3 for students and $5 for general. Tickets will go on sale starting Monday February 18, 2013.  Box office will be open from the hours of 1pm-5pm Monday through Thursday and thirty minutes before performance time.  For more information, please call Mrs. Modest at 274-2201.

Click here for Flyer PDF.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

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