May 1, 2014

GSU Continues Administration Structural Changes

GRAMBLING, LA — Grambling State University President Frank G. Pogue has announced some administrative changes effective next month.

Effective today (May 1), Stacey Duhon takes on the role of interim vice president for institutional advancement full time and David Ponton becomes interim associate vice president for student affairs and dean of students. Both will report to the president.

Dana Howard has been named interim director of residential life, responsible for Student housing and residential life. Residential life will report to Leon Sanders, vice president of finance and administration.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GSU’S Pogue Joins Vice President, Others to Address Sexual Assault

Grambling State University president is one of only five university presidents and the only HBCU president participating as White House launches aggressive sexual assault approach for universities nationally

GSU President Pogue was one of only 5 university presidents invited to attend the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assult.

GSU President Pogue was one of only 5 university presidents
invited to attend the White House Task Force to Protect Students
from Sexual Assult.

BY Grambling State University Media Bureau

GRAMBLING, LA — Grambling State University President Frank G. Pogue said a White House task force has released a “cutting edge” report that empowers higher education to better deal with sexual harassment and sexual assaults.

“It was a joy for me to have been invited by the White House to witness what I consider to be a cutting edge kind of report that’s going to have significant implications for higher education, and one that empowers higher education, particularly university presidents,” added Pogue. “This sexual assault matter has hit the White House and President Obama has taken on this challenge personally.”

Obama established the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault in January, and Tuesday the group provided recommendations to provide better enforcement on campuses, partly by providing universities with tools to fight the problem. Tuesday the task force released its report during a two-hour session that included Pogue and other higher education representatives as well as Education Secretary Arne Duncan and other cabinet members and government officials. U.S. Vice President Joe Biden chaired the task force and the meeting. Pogue was one of only five university presidents participating, and the only president of a historically black university to attend.

The president’s task force identified four key areas of focus: (1) identify the scope of the problem on college campuses, (2) help prevent campus sexual assault, (3) help schools respond effectively when a student is assaulted, and (4) improve, and make more transparent, the federal government’s enforcement efforts.  The group of participants included representatives from the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, a group of more than 400 state-supported colleges and universities that Pogue has been affiliated with for several years.

“Several AASCU presidents were invited to attend this historic session that will focus on data collection and recommendations of the president’s Task Force on Sexual Assault on college campuses,” Pogue said after attending Tuesday’s afternoon session with Biden and about 250 others in a White House auditorium with a standing room only crowd. “Representing Grambling, I am proud to be a witness to actions that support the many efforts we make everyday to ensure that our campus community is safe and respectful when it comes to basic human rights.”

Pogue said he is especially interested in one of the resulting tools to help colleges and universities, a survey with “evidence-based sample questions that schools can use to gauge the prevalence of sexual assault on campus, test students’ attitudes and awareness about the issue, and craft solutions.” The White House asked the institutions to voluntarily conduct the climate survey next year and, after refining some survey methodology, expand its use to all schools as a requirement.

“This isn’t anything any of us should fear,” said Pogue. “We should want to hear directly from our students on lots of issues, so why not sexual assault? We can talk with a few students about these issues but it is far better to use a student survey to determine what more we can and should do.”

The federal government effort includes the launch of NotAlone.gov, a website to help provide support to sexual assault survivors on college campuses. Biden called it “a confidential place to go.”

Another task force recommendation targets working with colleges to promote “bystander intervention,” convincing witnesses to step up, speak up and help. There will be a public service announcement featuring Obama, Biden and celebrities focused on men in particular.

The task force also wants to see colleges and universities identify and train “victim advocates” who can quickly provide emergency assistance when something happens as well as ongoing support. The White House plans to release a sample reporting tool and methods to maintain confidentiality as a part of what it sees as an effective sexual misconduct policy.

Pogue said the vice president emphasized that men must acknowledge and learn that when a woman says she is not interested that that is the end of it, that a woman’s “no” must mean no. “I always say to the men at the beginning of the academic year ‘No means no,’” said Pogue, noting that he’s done the same thing at each university where he has been president. “No man should ever attack a woman under any condition. None.”

The president said though most sexual assaults involve men attacking women, universities increasingly deal with women attacking men sexually, women attacking women and men attacking men. “We have to broaden this thing beyond traditional ideas,” he added. “It’s getting more involved, and that means these issues are more important.” 

WS

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

April 29, 2014

GSU Data, Planning Officer Leaves for Wisconsin

Nettie Daniels, a Mississippi native and Alcorn State grad, heads to Wisconsin to start an institutional effectiveness and assessment unit

Nettie Daniels, the university's planning officer in charge of all data and GSU facts, is leaving for another opportunity.
Nettie Daniels, the university’s planning officer in charge of
all data and GSU facts, is leaving for another opportunity.

BY NINFA SAAVEDRA
Grambling State University Media Bureau

GRAMBLING, LA — After several years of service under two Grambling State University presidents, Nettie Daniels, the university’s planning officer in charge of all data and GSU facts, is leaving for another opportunity.

The Mississippi native who has worked in a Louisiana system office will be departing for the Midwest after her last day at Grambling State University on June 30.

“I have accepted an offer from the University of Wisconsin–Platteville as executive director of the office of institutional effectiveness and assessment,” said Daniels, an Alcorn State University alumna.

This next professional career challenge gives Daniels the opportunity to create a planning office from scratch. She will hire a staff and centralize the university’s data reporting, institutional effectiveness and assessment efforts at the 8,700-student university, which is gearing up for a regional accreditation visit in 2016.

“Developing an office of institutional effectiveness and assessment at UWP will not be the first time I established such an office,” said Daniels. “I have nearly 30 years of experience in planning, assessment and effectiveness and I look forward to continuing my career at UWP.”

Daniels arrived at GSU after working at the University of Louisiana System as a staff member in Baton Rouge.  She had worked at the system office as associate vice president for institutional research, planning and evaluation for five years when Grambling State University asked her to consider GSU.

“The offer came at the right time for me, so I accepted the challenge to help prepare the university for an upcoming … review,” recalled Daniels, noting that the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) Commission on Colleges (COC) was reviewing the academic and other standards at GSU.

The 2000 SACS review had five recommendations specific to the university’s office of planning and research. With Daniels’ leadership, the 2010 review ended with zero recommendations. “It was one of my biggest achievements,” recalled Daniels. “It’s no small matter to work with our dedicated staff, turning over every concern, any possible issue, to make sure that we had no problems.”

During her tenure at GSU, Daniels served as the associate vice president for planning and institutional research from 2005-2012 and as associate vice president of the office of institutional planning, assessment and effectiveness from 2012-2014. Daniels and her staff have been responsible for planning presidential retreats, coordinating the development and implementation of the university’s five-year strategic plan and monitoring the assessment of strategic goals and objectives.

Some may not realize she has held an unofficial, special role with GSU President Frank G. Pogue.

"Nettie has been more than a planning officer to me. She’s been a trusted adviser and someone with whom I can talk about university as well as system operations and policies because she’s done some of it all,” said Pogue. “I wish her good luck as she leaves Louisiana and heads north to Wisconsin, and I hope the University of Wisconsin realizes that they’ve stolen a superb professional who will elevate them to new levels."

Daniels said she will miss a lot about GSU, especially her staff, a superb leader in Pogue and the great working relationship with her colleagues she has gained over the past 10 years since she has lived in Northern Louisiana.

She leaves with beneficial professional experiences. Added Daniels, “GSU has taught me that patience and persistence are key factors to success.”

Photo Credit:  GLENN LEWIS/Grambling State University Media Bureau.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

April 25, 2014

GSU, Coach Rob Museum Chosen for National Museum

GSU brings international sports reputation, especially with its football legacy, and the Eddie G. Robinson Museum is the only HBCU museum of its kind

Elaine Nicholas, the National Museum of African American History and Culture's senior curator of culture, visits GSU/Robinson Museum.
Elaine Nicholas, the National Museum of African American History and
Culture’s senior curator of culture, visits GSU/Robinson Museum.

By TIERRA SMITH
Grambling State University Media Bureau

GRAMBLING, LA — Grambling State University will be featured in the National Museum of African American History and Culture when it opens in Washington, D.C., in spring 2016.

"Having a space in a prominent museum like the new National Museum of African American History and Culture just for Grambling State will bring more attention to GSU and its students and alumni,” said Frank G. Pogue, the university president. “I look forward to visiting Washington, D.C., to see it after the museum opens."

The museum is the only national museum devoted solely to documenting the history and culture of African Americans. “(It) will tell the American story through the lens of the African American experience,” said Elaine Nicholas, the museum’s senior curator of culture during a recent (April 16) visit to the GSU campus. “Eleven exhibits will tell those stories using ionic artifacts.”

Grambling State, with a primary focus on its legendary football program, will be joined by a section featuring longtime GSU head football coach Eddie G. Robinson, the winningest coach in NCAA Division I football. In addition, there will be an area dedicated to the Bayou Classic.

“Grambling history has not only influenced HBCU sports but other collegiate and professional sports,” said Damion Thomas, an assistant professor of kinesiology at the University of Maryland College Park and the museum’s curator.

Nicholas and Thomas, who are actively involved with the production of the museum, toured Grambling State campus and the Eddie G. Robinson Museum as a part of a visit to determine which objects might best represent the school, the museum and the Bayou Classic. The visitors said they got a great sense of Grambling State tradition, Robinson’s lasting legacy, the people and community.

“One of the main goals today was to start the conversation about the objects needed to tell Grambling’s story,” said Thomas. With the help of Pogue, he and others worked with Wilbert Ellis, a former GSU baseball coach and president of the Friends of The Eddie G. Robinson Museum, and the Robinson family to identify some likely museum prospects, including some of Robinson’s playbooks and some of Coach Rob’s players’ jerseys worn by some of his most famous football players.

The national museum exhibit will include memorabilia from the Bayou Classic, the only HBCU classic football game that is televised nationally. “Out of all of the HBCU classics, the Bayou Classic is number one,” said Aaron James, the GSU athletic director.

“Bayou Classic is the Super Bowl of Classics,” added Dotti Belletto, president and CEO of NOCCI, the New Orleans-based company that manages the Bayou Classic for Grambling State University and Southern University. “These are traditions we want our children, and their children to experience. There has to be something that ties all of us together.”  Belletto said Pogue deserves a lot of credit for making this happen.

“Grambling State has a special place and a special role among all colleges and universities, including but not limited to HBCUs,” said Pogue, who hosted a small, private lunch for the visitors in the museum’s Doris Robinson Room. “This school is known across the state, across the region, across the nation and across the world.”

Since being established by the U. S. Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2003, the museum has collected 27,000 artifacts. The museum will cost $540 million to build, with half of the money being provided by the United States government and the other half raised by public-private partnerships.

Other historically black universities scheduled to be featured in the museum include Howard University, Southern University, Florida A&M, Tennessee State University, Tuskegee University and the annual Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association basketball tournament, commonly called the CIAA Basketball Tournament.

Elaine Nicholas tours the Robin Museum, to be featured in the new National Museum of African American History and Culture.
Elaine Nicholas tours the Robin Museum, to be featured in the new National Museum of African
American History and Culture.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

GSU World Famed Alum Promoted to Marine Band Leader

GSU alum, Andres Navarro, has been promoted to the position of warrant officer of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing Band in San Diego, Calif.
GSU alum, Andres Navarro, has been promoted to
the position of warrant officer of the 3rd Marine
Aircraft Wing Band in San Diego, CA.

By DONTAVIUS MOORE
Grambling State University Media Bureau

Grambling, LA – One Grambling State University alumnus landed his dream job recently, and he said GSU played a significant role.

Andres Navarro has been promoted to the position of warrant officer of the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing Band in San Diego, Calif. He holds the title as director of the band.

Navarro was in the Grambling State University World Famed Tiger Marching Band from 1997-2002. While in the band he played the French horn, bass guitar and piano.

"Andres was a superb musician and had raw talent that is very hard to find,” said Larry Pannell, GSU’s marching band director.

As he climbed the ranks in the GSU band, he became the head drum major of the band in the 2001-02 season. His talent was displayed in the 2002 film “Drumline” featuring actor Nick Cannon.

Navarro, 39, has been in the United States Military for 10 years. His band is broken down into five ensembles with a total of 52 members. He was promoted in 2013.

While playing the French horn at Stranahan High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, his band director, Israel Charles, encouraged him to attend Grambling State. Charles, also a GSU alum, is a part of Kappa Kappa Psi Fraternity Inc. and Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc., as is Navarro.

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Media Contact:
Will Sutton
318-533-5337
mediarelations@gram.edu

 

 

 

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