Bello Ahmadou Ahidjo Named Grambling State University’s 2015 Fall Valedictorian

 

Bello Ahmadou Ahidjo Named Grambling State University’s 2015 Fall Valedictorian

Bello Ahmadou Ahidjo (right), GSU’s 2015 fall valedictorian, shakes hands with President Willie Larkin (left) during commencement rehearsal on Dec. 16.

GRAMBLING, La., – Grambling State University is proud to announce Bello Ahmadou Ahidjo, a senior psychology major with a minor in sociology, as the valedictorian of the Fall Class of 2015. He will graduate with a 4.0 grade point average at 10 a.m. Friday at the Fredrick C. Hobdy Assembly Center.

“It is incredibly humbling and incredibly exciting at the same time,” Ahmadou Ahidjo said. “I don’t think I have had time to process all the emotions, but I am very happy, and I will do all I can to live up to the expectations of my department and Grambling.”

Ahmadou Ahidjo, of Yaounde, Cameroon, is the son of Denise Ahidjo and Ahmadou Ahidjo Sali. He attended Grambling on the advice of a family friend, John Gwan, who told him about Grambling’s small, close-knit community and caring faculty.

“Grambling has been wonderful,” he said. “I got to meet a lot of new people and lifelong friends. I got to find a new family, because Residential Life has been very welcoming and very supporting, and they have been my second family away from home.”

Ahmadou Ahidjo has been very active during his time at Grambling. He works as a resident assistant with the Department of Residential Life and Housing. He is also a member of the Earl Lester Cole Honors College, the National Society for Leadership and Success, the President’s List, the Psychology and Sociology Club, the Grambling Quiz Bowl Team, the Student Government Association and the National Black United Front.

Ahmadou Ahidjo would like to thank his supervisor, Rudolph Ellis, assistant director of residential life, and his advisor, Stacey Duhon, an assistant professor of sociology and psychology, for helping him make it at Grambling. He would also like to thank his mother for inspiring him to graduate.

“I am very thankful to my mom. She really pushed me and was there for me. I am incredibly thankful to her for everything she has done for me, and I will do everything to show her that her efforts were worth it,” he said.

After graduation, Ahmadou Ahidjo will pursue a master’s degree in psychology at Grambling State University and later a doctorate in clinical psychology. Eventually, he would like to return to African to open a therapy center for children with development challenges and learning disabilities such as autism.

“Autism is one of those issues that people often overlook,” he said. “There is not a lot of information, especially back home in Africa where we have a low understanding of these things. I want to raise as much awareness as possible.”

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Grambling State University Provides Guidelines, Information for 2015 Fall Commencement Events

 

GRAMBLING, La. – Grambling State University is scheduled to include more than 360 participants in the 2015 Fall Commencement at 10 a.m. Dec. 18 at the Fredrick C. Hobdy Assembly Center. The commencement speaker is Denise Young-Smith, vice president of worldwide human resources at Apple.

GSU is providing several ways that proud caregivers, parents, relatives and friends can watch the fall commencement. In addition, the university has provided some guidelines and helpful information for those who will be attending commencement.

CEREMONY PARTICIPANTS

Commencement Rehearsal for students participating in the 2015 Fall Commencement ceremony will be held at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 16 at the Fredrick C. Hobdy Assembly Center. On Dec. 18, graduates should arrive at the Assembly Center at 7:30 a.m., while faculty, staff and students participating in the ceremony will assemble at 8:30 a.m.

POST-COMMENCEMENT RECEPTION

A commencement reception will be held in McCall Dining Hall immediately following the event. Graduates and their guests are invited to participate. Participants attending the reception, which will feature light refreshments, are asked to park in designated parking locations. Violators may be towed.

PARKING

Visitors attending the commencement at the Assembly Center are asked to park in the designated locations. There will be a drop-off and pick-up area in front of the Assembly Center for those who are disabled and those with special circumstances and special needs, but this is not a parking area. Commencement participants are asked to park in the parking spaces near the Eddie G. Robinson Memorial Stadium sign closest to the Conrad Hutchinson Performing Arts Center to allow family and friends to park closest to the Assembly Center.

ARRIVAL/SEATING

The doors to the Assembly Center will open at 7 a.m. No visitors will be allowed to enter the Assembly Center before 7 a.m. All audience members should arrange for their parties to be seated at the same time. SAVING SEATS FOR OTHERS WILL NOT BE ALLOWED. Ushers will be monitoring the rows to ensure that all seats are filled. While waiting for commencement to begin, please be respectful and courteous to others attending the ceremony, mindful of any instructions made by Grambling employees working at commencement, and listen carefully to any pre-commencement announcements.

CONGRATULATIONS BANNERS/FLAGS/AIR HORNS

Everyone attending the commencement is asked to be respectful of others who want to hear the names of their graduates called, and to see their graduates walk in the procession and walk across the stage. To ensure that this formal event is as enjoyable for everyone as possible, NO CONGRATULATORY BANNERS, FLAGS OR AIRHORNS WILL BE ALLOWED INSIDE THE ASSEMBLY CENTER.

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

Only university-authorized campus and external media will be allowed on the floor of the Assembly Center to shoot and film the event. Only media with university-recognized media credentials will be allowed on the center’s floor, and only authorized campus and external media representatives with university-issued media passes will be permitted on the floor. All others will be asked to clear the area.

LIVE BROADCAST

To watch a live broadcast of commencement, visit www.gram.edu and click on the “Watch 2015 Fall Commencement Live” link on the right side of the webpage.

In addition, KGRM-FM will broadcast the entire commencement live. Tune in at 91.5 FM starting at 10 a.m. The station will broadcast until diplomas are awarded. Visit www.gram.edu/student-life/media/kgrm/, and click on the link at the bottom of the page to listen to KGRM live.

EXTERNAL MEDIA COVERAGE

External media are asked to contact the Office of University Communications and Media Relations at mediarelations@gram.edu or 318-274-2418 for further information regarding admittance to commencement and to make interview requests. All external media must show media credentials and wear a university-issued media pass during all commencement activities.

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GSU Professors Present Developmental English Pilot Program at SACSCOC

 

GSU Professors Present Developmental English Pilot Program at SACSCOC

Catherine Bonner and Connie Walton

Grambling, LA –Connie Walton, a professor in the Department of Chemistry, and Catherine Bonner, a lecturer in the Department of English, facilitated a group discussion about a development English pilot program implemented at Grambling State University in an effort to increase the academic success of freshman students who are underprepared for college-level English during the annual Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) meeting on Dec. 5 in Houston.

The discussion, entitled “Utilization of a ‘Speak Student’ Approach for Teaching English Composition to Underprepared Freshman Students,” showcased the successes of a developmental education pilot program implemented at Grambling State University during the fall 2013 and spring 2014 semesters, which was sponsored by the Louisiana Board of Regents.

The educators provided an overview of how contextualized and strategic instruction were used to facilitate student learning as demonstrated by student performance in the pilot, as well as their performance in the second sequence English course during the following semester.

The group discussion focused on how the developmental English pilot program was modified during the spring 2014 semester. Students were placed into groups by gender. The instructor met with each group on different days to address freshman-level English Composition content. A surprisingly significant result of that modification was that the male group took ownership of their class.

Attendees of the group discussion facilitated by Walton and Bonner represented universities in Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina. The attendees included directors of Quality Enhancement Plans (QEP), English faculty, the director of a writing center and a dean of a College of Education.

Walton said that the attendees were interested in learning about a teaching strategy that was successful in addressing student remediation needs.

“The group discussion participants were actively engaged and indicated that they would take some of the strategies discussed back to their universities and recommend implementation,” Walton said.

This is the fourth consecutive year that GSU faculty members have presented at a SACSCOC annual meeting, specifically highlighting the innovative work being done by faculty at Grambling State University.

“Dr. Walton spearheaded this endeavor from inception to completion,” Bonner said. “For me, affirmation that we had presented useful information came when a director of a university’s writing center said, ‘This was great.’”

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Two Former Professors Named to Governor-Elect Edwards’ Education Committees

 

Two Former Professors Named to Governor-Elect Edwards’ Education Committees

Mayor Edward Jones

Grambling, LA – Governor-Elect John Bel Edwards, who has announced education as one of his top priorities, has created two committees to examine the future of education in Louisiana. Two former professors, Grambling Mayor Edward Jones and Vicki Brown, have been named as members of these committees.

The Higher Education Transition Committee will make policy recommendations for higher education in Louisiana, particularly looking for ways to increase the state’s investment in higher education and to make college more affordable for students.

Mayor Jones, a 1974 graduate of Grambling State University, has been named a member of the 22-person committee. Jones has nearly 35 years of teaching experience, with the last 25 spent as a faculty member in the Department of English at Grambling State University.

“We have been given the task of making recommendations to the governor-elect on how we can enhance higher education in Louisiana,” Mayor Jones said. “We are interested in how we can better prepare our students in higher education to perform better in the workplace, to give our students the knowledge and skills they need to perform in the workplace, especially in the industries that are located in our state.”

Chaired by Scott Richard, executive director of the Louisiana School Boards Association, the second committee, the K-12 Education Committee, will examine issues important to K-12 public education, including curriculum, assessment, funding, and teacher, school and district accountability.

Vicki Brown, a retired professor in the Department of Educational Leadership, has been named a member of the K-12 Education Committee. Brown has more than 40 years of education experience, including serving as principal of Alma J. Brown Laboratory Elementary School and Grambling Laboratory Middle Magnet School for 20 years and chairperson of the Louisiana Education Consortium.

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Grambling Awards 23 STEM Scholarships Funded by AT&T Donation

Grambling Awards 23 STEM Scholarships Funded by AT&T Donation

First Row, L-R: LaTerra Smith, Elizabeth Eddy, Katerra Dooley, President Willie Larkin, Shermaine Shorter, Rochelle Joseph, Jazmyne Lewis, Genesis Williams, and David Aubrey, state director of external affairs for AT&T Louisiana. Second Row, L-R: Prentiss Smiley, Aaliyah Robinson, Zana Symone Hall, Timothy Ismael, Christina Bluford, and Wade Julien. Third Row, L-R: Otto Meyers, GSU vice president for advancement, research and economic development, Dominique Wilson, Jarett Triplett, and Joseph Dean.

Grambling, LA – Twenty-three Grambling State University students have been awarded scholarships in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) as a result of a $50,000 donation from AT&T.

AT&T made the donation in July to fund scholarships for 23 students, including one $5,000 scholarship, two $2,500 scholarships and 20 $2,000 scholarships. AT&T scholars were selected based on their application, essay, faculty recommendation, involvement in STEM-related extracurricular activities, grade point average and unmet financial need.

The scholarship recipients include LaTerra Smith, Elizabeth Eddy, Katerra Dooley, Shermaine Shorter, Rochelle Joseph, Jazmyne Lewis, Genesis Williams, Prentiss Smiley, Aaliyah Robinson, Zana Symone Hall, Timothy Ismael, Christina Bluford, Wade Julien, Dominique Wilson, Jarett Triplett, Joseph Dean, Alickson Alexandr, Sammu DeSilva, Lauren Fantroy-Winston, Tiffany Doss, Kyle Williams and Tracey Warrington.

“As a proud alumnus of GSU, I’m blessed to represent AT&T in congratulating these outstanding students that were selected to receive the AT&T scholarships,” said David Aubrey, state director of external affairs for AT&T Louisiana. “GSU produces outstanding graduates, and we are pleased to support the university as it continues its mission.”

These scholarships will also help fill a statewide need for STEM-trained employees necessary for Louisiana’s future workforce. Experts estimate Louisiana alone will have 69,000 STEM vacancies by 2018.

“As recognized on a global basis, one of the largest workforce deficiencies are in STEM areas,” said Otto Meyers, III, interim vice president of advancement, research and economic development. “More and more jobs are becoming more technical in nature. We have to help nurture and develop the workforce of the future, which includes STEM areas. It is critical to our nation’s efforts to ensure that we are developing a diverse STEM workforce pool if we are to continue to be innovation leaders well into the future.”

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2015 Fall Commencement Week Events

 

  1. Commencement Rehearsal for students participating in the 2015 Fall Commencement ceremony will be held at 9 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 16 at the Fredrick C. Hobdy Assembly Center.
     
  2. The Tiger Torch Night program for graduates: parents and members of the brambling community will be held at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 17 in T.H. Harris Auditorium: with a reception immediately following the event.
     
  3. Approximately 360 students will graduate during the 2015 Fall Commencement ceremony at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 18 in the Assembly Center. Denise Young-Smith, vice president of worldwide human resources at Apple: will serve as the commencement speaker. A reception for the graduates and their guests will be held in McCall Dining Hall immediately following commencement.
     

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Grambling State University’s 10 for $10 Challenge Raises $55K

 

Grambling State University’s 10 for $10 Challenge Raises $55K

President Willie Larkin accepts a $55,000 check presented by the 10 for $10 Challenge Campaign Committee. From left to right are Thomas Griffin of Chicago; Angelee Moody-Rhyne of Houston; Otto Meyers, III, GSU interim vice president of advancement, research and economic development; President Larkin; Eric Moses of Houston; Marva Nichols Griffin of Chicago; Kimberlie Paige of Dallas; and Talmon Butler, GSU community development coordinator. Committee members not pictured are LaCrecia Jones of New Orleans; Angela Mattison Shaw of Little Rock, Arkansas; Darryl Jackson of Grambling; Renecia Robinson of Houston; Michael Wilkerson of Shreveport, Louisiana; Delores Smith of Grambling; and Alvord Reese of Elm Hurst, Illinois.

GRAMBLING, La., – The Grambling State University community closed its first I’m a G 10 for $10 Challenge with a successful donation of $55,000 to the university, breaking the campaign’s goal of raising $50,000. More than 600 alumni donated to the campaign, and nearly 50 percent were first-time donors to the university.

“By all measures, Grambling’s 10 for $10 Challenge Campaign is an excellent example of how small dollars from some, coupled with big dollars from others, can come together and create big results at the end of the day,” President Willie Larkin said. “I feel encouraged by the uptick in Grambling State University alumni giving. Let’s keep it going, GramFam.”

The idea of the 10 for $10 Challenge is simple. A donor gives $10 or more to Grambling State University, challenges 10 other people to match their gift, and then challenges those 10 people to repeat the process. The campaign began in April as a way to encourage members of the Grambling community to take up the challenge to build a strong and sustainable future for the university.

“The 10 for $10 Challenge Campaign has made major strides in continuing to enhance a culture of giving to Grambling State University,” said Otto Meyers, III, interim vice president of advancement, research and economic development. “One of the appealing components of the campaign is that it still allowed donors to target their donations to a preferred university area or tag their donation as unrestricted, which provides the president the greatest degree of flexibility in targeting the funds to areas of immediate need. My congratulations go to the team of dedicated alumni that drove this campaign to success. Through the lessons learned from the team’s first 10 for $10 Challenge, we are looking forward to even greater success with the next 10 for $10 Challenge Campaign.”

The idea to use a small donation amount of $10 encouraged people, especially alumni who have never donated to the university before, to realize that any donation, no matter how large or small, can make a difference to the university.

One of the donors is Lebanon Creek Leadership and Management, whose employees donated $2,000 to the Grambling softball team. “We wanted to donate to a sports program that may not get as much attention as some of the other programs at the university,” said George Rhyne, Jr., a managing partner at Lebanon Creek Leadership and Management. “We chose to donate to the women’s softball program, because we noticed team members diligently selling game-day programs at every home game to help supplement some of their needs due to budget shortfalls. In addition the coach has been very responsive, appreciative and keeps us updated on his team. It is our pleasure to provide support to a worthy cause.”

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Apple VP Denise Young-Smith Named Grambling State University’s 2015 Fall Commencement Speaker

 

Apple VP Denise Young-Smith Named Grambling State University’s 2015 Fall Commencement Speaker

Denise Young-Smith

GRAMBLING, La., – Denise Young-Smith, vice president of worldwide human resources at Apple, will deliver Grambling State University’s 2015 Fall Commencement speech. The ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Dec. 18 in the Frederick C. Hobdy Assembly Center.

“Ms. Denise Young-Smith is a superb example of excellence,” Grambling President Willie Larkin said. “Since graduating from Grambling State University, she has made her mark as a stellar corporate executive. Her work at Apple has set the standard for graduates from Grambling and our sister HBCUs. She is a terrific role model for all of our students graduating on December 18, and we are extremely proud of her many outstanding accomplishments.”

Young-Smith is a graduate of Grambling State University. She earned a bachelor’s degree in communications in 1978 and later a master’s degree in organizational management, when she returned to her home state of Colorado.

While at Grambling, she was a member of the Orchesis Dance Company and a photography student with Grambling’s photographer, Glenn Lewis, who remembers her as a hard-working, dedicated and talented student.

“She was a very good student and an even better person,” Lewis said. “She was great in English and photography. Denise was a very well-rounded student who was big in extracurricular activities and very dedicated to her academic studies.”

Her connection to Grambling is a family affair, as several aunts, cousins and relatives have worked at and graduated from Grambling State University. Her father’s family and siblings were reared in West Monroe, Louisiana.

As vice president of worldwide human resources, Young-Smith is responsible for attracting and retaining top talent at Apple. She reports to CEO Tim Cook. Since joining Apple in 1997, Denise has served in several key human resources roles. For more than 10 years, she sat on the leadership team that built Apple’s retail organization, which now welcomes more than one million people every day.

Before retail, Young-Smith ran human resources for Apple’s Worldwide Operations and Corporate Employee Relations teams. Prior to Apple, she offered talent, human resources and management consulting expertise to early-stage businesses, including Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers portfolio companies.

Young-Smith is also an accomplished performer and soprano singer, having performed twice at Carnegie Hall and various European venues. She is currently completing work on a recording of classics songs, featuring jazz standards, arias and spirituals.

Most recently, Young-Smith has been instrumental in orchestrating Apple’s $40-million, multi-year commitment to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), the largest and most comprehensive corporate investment ever given exclusively for students and faculty of four-year HBCUs.

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Grambling State University’s HBCU Book Challenge Collects 4,500 Books for Prison Libraries

 

Grambling State University’s HBCU Book Challenge Collects 4,500 Books for Prison Libraries

Members of the GSU Psychology and Sociology Club delivered books donated during the HBCU Book Challenge to Caddo Correctional Center on Dec. 1. From left to right are: Sgt. Robert Montoya; Matt Sheptoski, faculty advisor; Jack Chandler, club president; Marcus Clark, a member of the Emergency Response Team at Caddo Correctional Center; Kristopher Brooks, a sophomore sociology major; and Franceskia Brown, a senior psychology major.

GRAMBLING, La., – The HBCU Book Challenge began as an effort by Grambling State University’s Psychology and Sociology Club members to bring more reading materials to inmates in Louisiana. After seeing a small prison library with a shortage of books, club members were inspired to organize a book drive last spring that collected 225 books for the inmates at Richwood Correctional Center in Monroe.

“This adventure got started when we were trying to look for more ideas inside the club,” Psychology and Sociology Club President Jack Chandler said. “A lot of the guys said let’s go to a prison. When we were at the prison at Richwood, Dr. (Matt) Sheptoski noticed the lack of materials, and said we’ve got our next project.”

Fueled by the success of their first book drive, the Psychology and Sociology Club members were inspired to hold a second book drive, while simultaneously challenging other Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) around the country to do the same.

The second book drive raised nearly 10 times the amount of the first drive, a total of 2,167 books collected from the students, employees and community members at Grambling, along with a generous donation from Lincoln Parish Library in Ruston.

Three other HBCUs took the challenge: Alabama State University, Alcorn State University and Savannah State University. Altogether, the four universities collected more than 4,500 books for prison libraries in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia.

GSU club members delivered the first of the donated books to Caddo Correctional Center in Shreveport on Dec. 1.

“Some of these inmates are very smart, and bringing in books is good for them,” said Sgt. Robert Montoya, who has worked at Caddo Correctional Center for 17 years.

The students also toured the correctional facility, which gave them the opportunity to see the library where the softcover books can be checked out by inmates, as well as the program facility where instructors and tutors will use the donated textbooks to teach inmates.

“Seeing the books properly placed inside the prison library among other books was very rewarding. Seeing the accomplishment of the club and the different community leaders come to life felt rewarding, because we have people inside the prison who are going to tutor other prisoners. You never know what reading level someone is at, so I am glad we have a variety of books where people can grow their reading skills,” Chandler said.

For Matt Sheptoski, the faculty advisor of the Psychology and Sociology Club, the most rewarding part of the day was being thanked by an inmate in the prison library.

“There was actually an inmate working in the prison library, and he said to us that the books that we donated will specifically be useful in what he does. He teaches social studies, so it was nice to hear from an actual inmate who said this is meaningful, this is helpful, and he just wanted to thank us,” said Sheptoski, who wanted to thank everyone who participated in the HBCU Book Challenge.

“The GSU Psychology and Sociology Club would like to extend a sincere thank you to all community members from Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia who helped make the HBCU Challenge a monumental success,” he said.

“We enthusiastically acknowledge the efforts of those at our sister schools who accepted our challenge to a friendly competition, so thank you Alabama State University, Alcorn State University and Savannah State University students, faculty, alumni and stakeholders. Billed as a friendly competition, HBCU Challenge participants collected over 4,500 books, a collective victory which all who participated in can be proud of. The true victors, we hope and pray, however, will be the inmates whose perspectives are broadened and whose lives may be touched by the books you have donated.”

For more information, please contact Chandler at 318-572-8478 or jackchandler88@gmail.com.

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Legendary Coach Eddie Robinson Named 2015 American Football Coaches Association’s Trailblazer Award Winner

 

Legendary Coach Eddie Robinson Named 2015 American Football Coaches Association’s Trailblazer Award Winner

Eddie G. Robinson

Legendary Coach Eddie G. Robinson has been named the American Football Coaches Association’s (AFCA) recipient of the 2015 Trailblazer Award. The award will be presented posthumously at the AFCA President’s Kickoff Luncheon on Monday, Jan. 11 at the 2016 AFCA Convention in San Antonio, Texas. Robinson passed away in 2007 at the age of 88.

The AFCA Trailblazer Award was created to honor early leaders in the football coaching profession who coached at historically black colleges and universities. Past Trailblazer Award winners include Charles Williams of Hampton (2004), Cleve Abbott of Tuskegee (2005), Arnett Mumford of Southern (2006), Billy Nicks of Prairie View A&M (2007), Alonzo “Jake” Gaither of Florida A&M (2008), Fred “Pops” Long of Wiley (2009), Harry R. “Big Jeff” Jefferson of Bluefield State (2010), Edward P. Hurt of Morgan State (2011), Vernon “Skip” McCain of Maryland-Eastern Shore (2012), Marino Casem of Alcorn State (2013) and Gideon Smith of Hampton (2014). The award is given each year to a person that coached in a particular decade ranging from 1920-1970. This year’s winner coached from 1941 to 1970.

Robinson attended Leland College in Baker, La., where he played quarterback and led the team to a combined 18–1 record over the 1939 and 1940 seasons. During his final two years at Leland, he also served as an assistant coach. He earned his bachelor’s degree in 1941 and received a master’s degree from the University of Iowa in 1954.

In 1941, Grambling, then known as Louisiana Negro Normal and Industrial Institute, hired Robinson to coach football and basketball and teach physical education. In his first season, he had no assistants and no budget for replacing equipment. He handled virtually everything himself, from mowing the field to taping players’ ankles to writing accounts of the games for the local newspaper. That season, his team posted a record of 3-5. The next season, however, he guided the team to a perfect 8-0 record.

Robinson spent 57 seasons consistently fielding stellar football teams and guiding his young charges to successful lives both on and off the gridiron. After surpassing Amos Alonzo Stagg’s 314 coaching victories in 1984, he tied legendary Alabama coach Paul “Bear” Bryant’s 323-win mark with a 23-6 win

over Oregon State before becoming the career wins leader the next week with a 27-7 win over Prairie View A&M. He earned an unprecedented 408 college football victories, which is second behind Joe Paterno in Division I history. Coach Robinson retired with nine Historical Black College and University national championships, 19 Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) titles and an overall record of 408-165-15.

Robinson produced more than 200 players who went on to play professional football, most notably, Buck Buchanan, Willie Brown, Charlie Joiner and Willie Davis, who are enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He coached over 4,000 student-athletes, of which over 80 percent received their college degrees.

In addition to being recognized as the 2015 AFCA Trailblazer Award recipient, Robinson received the 1982 AFCA Amos Alonzo Stagg Award and was the first active coach to receive the AFCA’s highest honor, the Tuss McLaughry Award, which was awarded to him in 1996. The Football Writers Association of America’s Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year Award is named in his honor, and Grambling also named its football facility, Eddie Robinson Stadium, after him. Robinson was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1997, the SWAC Hall of Fame in 1992 and the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame in 1976. Robinson also served on the AFCA Board of Trustees from 1971 to 1975 and served as the AFCA President in 1976.

The AFCA was founded in 1922 and currently has more than 11,000 members around the world ranging from the high school level to the professional ranks. According to its constitution, the AFCA was formed, in part, to “maintain the highest possible standards in football and in the coaching profession” and to “provide a forum for the discussion and study of all matters pertaining to football.”

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