NCATE

NCATE

NCATE Standard 1 Report


The candidate assessment data provide evidence that the unit is meeting professional, state, and institutional standards and that candidates have positive impacts on P-12 student learning. Specific evidence is provided to demonstrate the candidates' successful mastery of appropriate Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions that serve to impact student learning in the P-12 school setting. Knowledge-Specifically, the knowledge assessment data reveal that candidates are very knowledgeable of their content as indicated by 100% Praxis passage rate across all initial programs. Exhibit1.4.a-Table 1.1 records the initial teacher candidate Praxis pass rate on content licensure tests for the following years: Fall 2011-Spring 02; Fall 2012-Spr. 2013; Fall 2013-Spr. 2014. Also, candidates in the Special Education component demonstrate knowledge in an academic discipline as well as in Special Education pedagogical content knowledge and skills. These data reflect candidates' pass rates for Fall 2011-Spring 2012; Fall 2012-Spr.2013; Fall 2013-Spr. 2014 as shown in Table 1.1 (Exhibit1.4.a). Candidates in the alternative teacher certification program also demonstrate evidence of content knowledge through success on general and content specialty Praxis assessments. The assessment data for completers in the MAT Alternative Teacher Certification Program (ATCP) that was initially known as the Teach GSU Program reflect pass rates on content licensure tests. Specifically, in Exhibit1.4.a Table 1.1a the data reflect pass rates on content licensure tests for Teach GSU completers for 2013-2014; 2012-2013; and 2011-2012. In Exhibit1.4.a Table 1.1b the data also reflect pass rates on content licensure tests for Fall 2012 and Fall 2013 for MAT Alternative Teacher Certification completers. Further evidence of knowledge that the candidates possess knowledge of the "in depth content that they teach" is reflected in the course assessments and activities. In summary, the assessment data for the previous 3 years is reflected in Exhibit1.4.b. Examples of the assessment data are also reflected in Exhibit1.4.g. These samples follow: 1) ED 312: Introduction to the Education of Exceptional Children (Planning for Inclusive Classrooms); 2) ED 581 :Leadership Seminar (Diversity Lesson Plan; 3) ED 452 Advanced Seminar Methods(Daily Lesson Plan and Thematic Unit); 4) ED 504-Reading for Children (The Reading-Writing Connection: Writing Children's Books); 5) ED 402: Instructional Technology (Technology Lesson Integration). Skills-Assessment data provide evidence that candidates demonstrate professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills as they complete various signature course assessments and experiences. Specifically, the results of key course assessments and scoring guides used for assessing candidate learning against professional and state standards demonstrate that candidates possess strong professional and pedagogical knowledge (Exhibits1.4.c). For example, aggregate data on selected key assessments (from AIMS) are identified in Exhibit1.4.d. Additionally, the Unit's Conceptual Framework that presents an alignment with SPA standards is also included in Exhibit1.4.d. Another example of assessment data providing evidence that candidates demonstrate professional and pedagogical knowledge and skills is reflected in in ED 431 Diagnosis and Correction of Reading Difficulties. This course provides opportunities for the candidates to analyze, research, and assess selected students in the P-12 schools. Specifically, as the candidates prepare for their culminating signature project (The Diagnostic- Remediation Connection), they connect course experiences, analyze research, and use the case study model to complete the following: 1) administer formal and informal assessment measures to identify the reading/literacy needs of the subject (student); 2) select and use appropriate instructional strategies and resources based on the assessment results; 3) re-assess to determine the impact of the instruction/treatment. (Exhibit1.4.h) Several candidates have presented the results of the design and implementation of their Diagnostic-Remediation Packet at the Annual Research Symposium at local and state levels (see Exhibit1.4.h-The Diagnostic-Remediation Connection Assessment). This signature project provides various opportunities for candidates to assess student learning and use assessments to design and implement instruction designed to positively impact student learning (Exhibit1.4.h). This signature project as well as other samples included provide opportunities for candidates to apply professional and pedagogical knowledge as they become engaged in professional experiences. Some of these include the following:1) NASA/NICE Involvement; 2) Leadership Summit; 3) MLBCEO Speaks to Students Through SKYPE Newspaper; 4) Health Seminar; 5) Poor Man's Supper; 6)Special Needs Basketball (Marcus Hicks Spring 2015); 7) Spring Fling Collaboration between GSU and LA TECH. Additional evidence of candidates meeting pedagogical knowledge and skills is demonstrated in their engagement in professional activities. For example, for the past 20 years, the initial and advanced candidates have been involved in planning and implementing the Department of Curriculum and Instruction Annual Spring Reading Conference. (Exhibit1.4.h). The candidates have also served as featured presenters for the event. Another example is candidate involvement in the 2015 Summer Enrichment Program, at the Grambling Housing Authority. (Exhibit1.4.h -Ruston Daily Leader Newspaper Article). Specifically, the candidates had an opportunity to provide meaningful Reading/Literacy experiences for a group of students in PK-5 grades. Professional Dispositions-The assessment data on professional dispositions provide evidence that initial and advanced candidates possess positive professional dispositions. See Exhibit1.4.e for scoring guides used for assessing professional dispositions. Specifically, during the academic year of 2013-2014, 25 initial candidates were assessed on their professional dispositions. As seen in the data summary table (Exhibit1.4.f), the majority of candidates had the desired dispositions either almost always or always. For most categories 80% or more of the candidates had the expected dispositions. Data from the Dispositions Inventories were discussed in the College of Education Assessment Retreat. The dispositions data on the advanced candidates provide primary evidence that they possess positive professional dispositions. Exhibit1.4.f provides a table that outlines the results of 34 reporting advanced candidates in the Master of Education program from the Spring of 2011 until the Fall of 2014. The rubric of the scales asks respondents to rate themselves 5=Always, 4=Almost Always, 3=Often, 2=Sometimes & 1= Never. Students scored the highest in Disposition 3.8 (Display a classroom climate conducive to learning) 4.88. Overall, the scores in each category of the Dispositions Instrument were above always and closer to almost always. (Exhibit1.4.f) The data further indicate that mean scores for 7 out of the 8 classes exceeded 4.50 in this disposition indicating that respondents as a whole believe that they always are almost always had a positive self-concept development and respect for others. The eighth class (Spring 2014) scored in the range of often to almost always having a positive self-concept development and respect for others. The data reveal that 7 out of the 8 classes means scores of over 4.50 in this disposition which mean respondents as a whole in 7 out of 8 classes believe that they always are almost always demonstrate sensitivity to the many facets of diversity. Three of these 7 classes scored a perfect mean score (5) indicating that all students in those classes believe that they always demonstrate sensitivity to the many facets of diversity. The eighth class (Spr. 2014) scored in the range of often to almost always demonstrate sensitivity to the many facets of diversity. Mean scores in excess of 4.50 for 7 out of the 8 classes in this disposition indicates that respondents as a whole in 7 out of 8 classes believe that they always are almost always demonstrate sensitivity to the many facets of diversity Based on the data from the Dispositions Inventory (see Exhibit1.4.f), the candidates in the initial and advanced programs during the reporting period possess the professional dispositions necessary to help all student learn. The data further reveal that for Disposition 3.2. mean scores in excess of 4.50 for 7 out of the 8 classes indicating that respondents as a whole in 7 out of 8 classes believe that always are almost always had a positive attitude and mutual respect towards students, parents and colleagues. The eighth class (Spr. 2014) scored in the range of often to almost always having a positive attitude and mutual respect towards students, parents and colleagues. There was one class (Spr. 2012) that averaged the highest possible score meaning everyone in the class believed they always have a positive attitude and mutual respect towards students, parents and colleagues. (Exhibit1.4.f). Additionally, Disposition 3.3 (Display Sensitivity to Diverse Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences) has two dimensions. Seven out of 8 classes believe that they always are almost always displayed sensitivity to diverse learning styles and multiple intelligences. Five of these seven classes scored a perfect mean score (5) identifying that all students in those classes always displayed sensitivity to diverse learning styles and multiple intelligences. The eighth class (Spr. 2014) scored in the range of often displayed sensitivity to diverse learning styles and multiple intelligences. The mean scores for each class in Disposition 3.3 include; Spr. 2011=5, Fall 2012=4.85, Spr. 2012=5, Fall 2012=5, Spr. 2013=5, Fall 2013=5, Spr. 2014=3, Fall 2014=4.66. (Exhibit 1.4.f)

Content Knowledge. The Unit has engaged faculty in other departments in reviews of candidate performance on Praxis I and Praxis II, both measures of content knowledge, and has developed strategies to align curriculum in these general education and other content courses with those specific areas measured on the Praxis examinations. These have resulted in alignment of course objectives, activities, and assessments for the General Education courses as indicated: ENG 101 and 102; Math 131 and 132; Social Studies courses in HIST 101 and ECON 102; and Science, BIOL 103. The Unit also adopted additional mathematics courses to strengthen all candidates' knowledge of mathematics. These recent additions include MATH 131_College Algebra, MATH 147---Pre-Calculus I, and MATH 148---Pre-Calculus II. Previously, these course were only required for Mathematics and Science majors. The courses themselves added a one hour lab in addition to the three hours of classroom instruction, intended to strengthen the mathematics content knowledge of candidates. Additional resources were acquired to further support and enhance mathematics knowledge and skills of candidates, including a Math Clinic staffed 8 hours per day by mathematics faculty dedicated to assisting candidates, and a PLATO computerized Laboratory to extend mathematics skills. An additional resource developed and implemented by one of the mathematics faculty members (Mr. Eugene Taylor) is the Instructional Test Preparation Math Resources stressing skills necessary for mastery of the mathematics section of the Praxis. These resources have resulted in candidate improvement in mathematics content knowledge and skills (See Exhibit 1.4.h) Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills. Unit faculty and staff continue to provide workshops designed to enhance candidate knowledge and skills in content and pedagogy. Unit faculty teaching 300 and 400 level professional courses have designed examination items verisimilar to those utilized on the Praxis examinations. One of the required advanced courses for all candidates, ED 452 Advanced Seminar Methods, requires that candidates participate in a 2-day PLT Workshop focused on:1) test content and time allowance;2) test style and types of questions; 3) designing appropriate item responses; 4)connections of the course content and the Knowledge Base Strands presented in the course with the knowledge required for successful completion of the PLT; and 5) developing and practicing test-taking strategies. Presentations on resources used and other test-success strategies are shared by candidates who experienced success on the PLT. An additional improvement strategy is the requirement that all incoming freshman students declaring education as a prospective major enroll in FYE 101 and FYE 102, both of which include test-taking strategies, participation in learning communities, and introduction to the Praxis examinations. Unit faculty and administrators meet periodically to discuss additional strategies to enhance content knowledge of prospective candidates and to promote their success on required Praxis examinations. Additional content and pedagogical content were added to the curriculum for teaching candidates as the State of Louisiana adopted the Common Core State Standards and the COMPASS teacher evaluation instrument in 2010. The curriculum, course content, and assessments were revised to align with these state adopted standards. In fall 2012, the Teacher Candidate Evaluation instruments were revised to reflect the special critical attributes of the three domains consistent with pedagogical areas on COMPASS. These improvements focused on promoting candidate skills in planning and delivering instruction effective for learning of all students. Pedagogical Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions. The Unit has made the conscious decision to expand field and internship placements to inclusion classroom settings demonstrating implementation of Universal Design for Learning and differentiated instruction strategies. Additional opportunities for candidates to work and interact closely with professionals in the P-12 communities have been incorporated into the curriculum to enhance candidate professionalism and positive dispositions. Observation checklists and evaluation instruments have been revised and aligned with state and institutional standards and provide ample opportunities for performance-based feedback to candidates to promote their continuous improvement. In order to facilitate continuous improvement in program quality and candidate performance the Unit routinely engages in the following activities: Review and revision of course content, activities, and assessments, ensuring alignment with all adopted standards; monitoring candidate performance in coursework and field experiences utilizing multiple assessment tools; and systematically collecting and analyzing data from field supervisors and cooperating teachers focused on candidate impact on student learning. Unit faculty have incorporated into course activities multiple opportunities for candidates to engage in self-reflection at the conclusion of major class projects, end of the semester, and at completion of field experiences. Finally, data from the "Follow-Up Study of Graduates" (Exhibit 1.4.i) and the "Employer Feedback on Graduates" (Exhibit 1.4.j) are closely reviewed to help insure that course experiences, activities and assessments appropriately reflect the feedback. These data are also very important to help promote continuous program improvement. Additionally, data from the state are also closely reviewed to help insure that the Grambling State University Teacher Preparation program is reflective of critical elements and experiences that are designed to help promote candidate success and student achievement. (Exhibit 1.4.k)

Standard 1 Exhibits