NCATE Standard 4 Report


STANDARD 4. DIVERSITY

The unit designs, implements, and evaluates curriculum and provides experiences for candidates to acquire and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Assessments indicate that candidates can demonstrate and apply proficiencies related to diversity. Experiences provided for candidates include working with diverse populations, including higher education and P-12 school faculty; candidates; and students in P-12 schools.

[In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]

4a. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Curriculum and Experiences

4a.1. What proficiencies related to diversity are candidates expected to develop and demonstrate?

In the Unit both initial and advanced candidates are expected to develop and demonstrate various proficiencies related to diversity. These proficiencies are clearly articulated in the outcomes of the Conceptual Framework.  The proficiencies are: (1) describe diverse strategies for interrelating disciplines in the instructional process; (2) identify technology infusion strategies for diverse populations; (3) demonstrate the use of diverse experiences that incorporate the underlying philosophy of education that is multicultural across the curriculum; (4) apply strategies that accommodate diverse learner needs by selecting and using appropriate resources. (5) analyze research that relates to strategies for promoting effective teaching and learning in a global society; (6) demonstrate an awareness of the social, cultural, political, economic, and comparative contexts of schools and learners; (7) display positive self-concept development and respect for others (8) display sensitivity to diverse learning styles and multiple intelligences; and (9) demonstrate sensitivity to the many facets of diversity. Additionally, candidates at the advanced level are being prepared to take roles of leadership in educational settings that are highly diverse. GSU and the Unit provide curricular experiences for the development of those proficiencies “to help all students reach their full potential” which is a commitment outlined in GSU’s mission statement as well as the Unit’s Conceptual Framework (Exhibit B1-8-1).

4a.2. What required coursework and experiences enable teacher candidates and candidates for other school professional roles to develop:

  Awareness of the importance of diversity in teaching and learning; and

   The knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions to adapt instruction and/or services for diverse populations, including linguistically and culturally diverse students and students with exceptionalities.

The Unit requires coursework and creates experiences that enable candidates to develop diversity proficiencies.  Also, field experiences afford candidates opportunities to apply understandings about diversity in a variety of settings.  Diversity is a critical component in the placement of students in field experiences.  Furthermore, professional development experiences such as research symposia are implemented on an annual basis in the Unit to enhance cultural responsiveness, instructional skills and contributions to the professional knowledge base.  In addition, GSU promotes diversity through the Center for International Programs (http://www.gram.edu/life/student life/ciap/about.php) in which teacher candidates are actively involved. 

The concept of diversity is infused throughout the curriculum, introduced at the 200 level, developed and emphasized at the 300 level and mastered and applied at the 400 level coursework.  For example, awareness of the influence of diverse contexts is introduced early in ED 200 Human Growth and Development (Exhibit B1-5-1) and the emphasis increases as students advance in the program. The ED 200 course introduces social-cultural differences related to ethnic background, language, and gender as well as exceptionalities and learning differences. However, two required courses that specifically target candidate development of knowledge, skills and dispositions related to diversity are ED 312 Introduction to the Education of Exceptional Children and ED 317 Multicultural Education (Exhibit B1-5-1). ED 317 was added to the professional education course sequence to focus on the educational, sociological, and psychological principles of teaching diverse learners where candidates explore the philosophies, theories, strategies, and competencies required to effectively motivate, educate, direct, manage and evaluate learners in a diverse classroom.  Field experiences in the course consist of 10 hours of observation and participation, the focus of which includes exploration of levels of cultural knowledge and acceptance of diversity within specific populations and engagement in microteaching activities for diverse learners.  

Another example is the ED 322 Teaching Reading in the Middle/Junior & Senior High School course in which candidates study strategies and materials that promote multicultural education in the content reading program. Exceptionalities are addressed in several of the courses cited.  Moreover the academic content areas address diversity issues in methods classes (ED 452 Advanced Teaching Methods, ED 453 Advanced Teaching Methods II, ED 402 Instructional Technology Integration, ENG 455 Methods of Teaching English (Exhibit B1-5-1).

Teacher candidates engage in diversity embedded curriculum in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences as well as the College of Education.  In ART 210 Visual and Performing Arts (Exhibit 4A2-1-2), teacher candidates study how the beliefs and values of various cultures affect the creation and production of art. ART 302 Teaching Young Children through the Arts (Exhibit 4A2-1-3) provides instruction on specific teaching strategies for diverse students.  In MUS 319 Music Appreciation and MUS 415 and 416 Music History, candidates study music from non-western as well as western cultures. In Foreign Language courses candidates study many countries (Spain, Latin America, US), study variety of dialects and engage in comparisons of cultures.  In the mathematics methods course, candidates study diverse numerical systems and study cultural history regarding mathematics (Exhibit 4A2-1-4).  In this course candidates are taught a variety of strategies to use with students at diverse achievement levels.

As advanced candidates progress through the program, they are provided with opportunities to continue developing skills in understanding and honoring diversity, demonstrating the ability to work effectively with students, parents and colleagues from various backgrounds and creating a transformative environment for student learning.  Advanced candidates’ skills in working with diverse populations are enhanced through a variety of projects and courses.  The LECF 704 course examines diversity issues. An example is LECF 704 Socio-cultural and Diversity Issues in Education (Exhibit B1-5-1) in which candidates complete a cultural autobiography to enhance diversity dispositions (Exhibit 4A2-1-5, Exhibit 4A2-1-6).  Sample data indicating advanced candidates’ knowledge to adapt instruction and services to diverse populations are shown in performance on the LECF 704 Literature Research Paper (Exhibit 2a-2-2).

In a number of courses in the master’s and doctoral programs, field experiences are required. These experiences generally take place in public school districts in north Louisiana.  They occur in diverse settings and involve working with diverse groups of students, parents, school district personnel and community members (Exhibit B1-2-3).


4a.3. What key assessments provide evidence about candidates' proficiencies related to diversity? How are candidates performing on these assessments?

The Unit assessment system includes a number of key assessments that measure candidates’ knowledge, skills and professional dispositions related to diversity. These assessments are aligned with Conceptual Framework’s diversity outcomes (Exhibit B1-2-13).  Some of the assessments are used in various courses that focus on diversity while others are used during field experiences and clinical practices. Regular review of data on key assessments, as well as on courses that emphasize diversity indicates that candidates in both initial and advanced programs demonstrate proficiencies related to diversity reflected in their knowledge, skills and professional dispositions.

One key assessment tool that measures candidates’ proficiencies related to diversity is the Dispositions Inventory. This instrument has been devised to help diversity awareness of candidates in three different transition points (Exhibit B1-2-13) as they progress in their respective programs. According to this data, candidates’ professional dispositions have improved over time. For example the data show that in Transition Point 1 only 59.0% of candidates at the initial level demonstrate an awareness of the many facets of diversity rated as “always”, whereas in Transition Points 2 and 3 the percentage rises to 73.2% and 80.0% respectively (Exhibit 4A3-1-5). At the advance level, the data also indicate candidate dispositions at 50.0%, 83.2% and 80.0%, respectively (Exhibit 4A3-1-6). 

Additional results of candidate improvement in diversity proficiency are shown in outcomes on the “Reconstructing Lives” assessment in the ED 200 Human Growth and Development course, in which each candidate is required to “walk in another’s shoes” by reading a biography or autobiography of a successful person and then following a step-by-step process to analyze the achiever’s problems and success factors to reconstruct the achiever’s life. The final steps are reflecting on personal and professional lessons learned from the achiever and applying concepts learned in the course (Exhibit 4A3-1-3).  In addition, sharing the results of the project exposes other candidates to a wider range of persons (categories of race, economic level, gender and ability). Not only are enhancements of diversity dispositions shown in performance scores but also in candidate reflections (Exhibit 4A3-1-4).  Candidate proficiencies and dispositions are also noted in key assessments for the diversity-based courses ED 312 Introduction to the Education of Children and ED 317 Multicultural Education (Exhibit 2a-2-2).

4a.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to diversity proficiencies and assessments may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

4b. Experiences Working with Diverse Faculty

4b.1. What opportunities do candidates (including candidates at off-campus sites and/or in distance learning or alternate route programs) have to interact with higher education and/or school-based faculty from diverse groups?

The Unit emphasizes that faculty diversity is one of the important considerations in teaching and learning. Candidates are given opportunities to interact with diverse faculty, familiarize themselves with different teaching techniques, appreciate cultural and language differences, develop harmony within a multiplicity of individual differences, and prepare to work with students in a diverse society. The College is committed to providing its candidates with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to be effective educators and community leaders in a global society.

GSU recruits, employs, and retains faculty members from diverse cultures, ethnicities, languages, religions, regional and national origins, and higher education backgrounds, which is a rich opportunity for our candidates to grow in knowledge. An analysis of faculty data reveals that the university faculty is characterized by adequate diversity to provide appropriate exposure and experiences to candidates. They include individuals from a variety of countries and from the continents of Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America.

Faculty of non-American national origins completed some or all of their higher education in their countries of origins, thereby bringing to the campus the dimensions of diverse educational systems and philosophies. These faculty work in several different departments at the university; therefore, candidates have opportunities for diverse interactions in different academic disciplines. In addition, the Unit’s faculty have earned terminal degrees in a variety of institutions in the United States.

Although Grambling is historically and predominantly Black, the faculty is ethnically diverse as shown in Table 8. The faculty is also well balanced in terms of gender.  Faculty belong to many different religions and religious denominations. Faith traditions represented among faculty include Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam and Judaism.


4b.2. What knowledge and experiences do faculty have related to preparing candidates to work with students from diverse groups?

 Faculty’s knowledge and expertise help them to prepare candidates to work with students from diverse groups. Many faculty members have either studied and/ or taught in a number of national and international universities. Faculty experiences include numerous presentations and other scholarly activity throughout the United States where they have interacted with colleagues from diverse backgrounds.  When faculty members return to the university, those experiences are shared for candidate capacity building.  Furthermore, faculty experiences range from studying in countries such as The United States, United Kingdom, Jamaica, Nigeria, Kenya and Ethiopia, and also faculty have made academic visits to countries across the globe.  They have made academic visits to Ghana, Lesotho, Ethiopia, South Africa, China, Turkey the UK and other countries. These experiences are shared with candidates on special academic diversity-related forums. Candidates gain from these experiences to augment and enhance their knowledge, skills and professional dispositions. As a result, these interactions have a great impact on the students from diverse groups. For example a faculty member who recently visited the continent of Africa made presentations on the educational systems and opportunities in Ghana, Lesotho, South Africa and Ethiopia (Exhibit 4B-1-1) Another Faculty member who made academic-related visits to China, as well as a one-year Fulbright Fellowship to Jamaica,  also shared those experiences at faculty and candidate forums.  In addition to International experiences, faculty members also have credentials and numerous professional development activities related to diversity as documented in faculty vita and scholarly activity (Exhibit 5a1-3-1, Exhibit 5c1-1-1, Exhibit 5c5-3-1).


4b.3. How diverse are the faculty members who work with education candidates?

Table 8 goes here.

4b.4. What efforts does the unit make to recruit and retain a diverse faculty?

GSU is an equal opportunity employer.  GSU as well as the Unit makes several efforts to recruit and retain diverse faculty. When vacancies occur, a wide search is conducted.  Job openings are posted on the GSU web-site and other media, including The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Also administrators and faculty members engage in recruitment efforts at professional conferences, through social networking in professional organizations.  The College of Education continues to strengthen its efforts to recruit and retain diverse faculty through adherence to the general policy and to the university’s specific “Diversity Statement” which reaffirms its practice of employment that is inclusive and based on equal opportunity principles.  The Unit currently has diverse faculty and will remain focused on retaining our diverse faculty.


4b.5. Faculty Diversity

Table 8

Faculty Demographics

Fall 2009

 

Prof. Ed. Faculty Who Teach Only in Initial Teacher Preparation Programs

n (%)

Prof. Ed. Faculty Who Teach Only in Advanced Programs

n (%)

Prof. Ed. Faculty Who Teach in Both Initial Teacher

Preparation & Advanced

Programs

n (%)

All Faculty in the Institu-tion

n (%)

School- based faculty*

n (%)

American Indian or Alaska Native

0%

0%

0%

0%

See Exhibit 5a2-1-1

Asian

0%

0%

0%

10.3%

N/A

Black or African American, non-

Hispanic

80%

88%

83%

65.3%

N/A

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific

Islander

0%

0%

0%

0%

N/A

Hispanic or Latino

0%

0%

0%

3%

N/A

White, non-Hispanic

10%

12%

17%

21%

N/A

Two or more races

0%

0%

0%

0%

N/A

Other:

African and Caribbean

10%

0%

0%

0%

N/A

Race/ethnicity unknown

0%

0%

0%

0.4%

N/A

Total

100%

100%

100%

100%

N/A

Female

83%

25%

100%

44%

N/A

Male

17%

75%

0%

56%

N/A

Total

100%

N=20

100%

N=8

100%

N=6

100%

N=242

N/A

*The Laboratory School Faculty consist of majority African American and the following distribution:

Alma J. Brown Elementary School: Specialists in Gifted and Talented and Speech Pathology provide some diversity in staff as they White.  Grambling Middle Magnet School has one White faculty member. Grambling High School has two White faculty members.

4c. Experiences Working with Diverse Candidates

4c.1. What opportunities do candidates (including candidates at off-campus sites and/or in distance learning or alternate route programs) have to interact with candidates from diverse groups?

The teacher candidates have several opportunities to interact with local, national and international students.  At the university level, there are broad opportunities for interaction with students from many areas (Exhibit 4C1-1-1).  The Fall 2009 data show that students represent local, regional and national geographic locations.  Nearly 10% of students come from abroad.  At the Unit level, credible efforts are made to train, increase and retain a diverse core of candidates and to expose them to diverse experiences at GSU, Louisiana and ULM through cooperative partnerships.  Currently the Unit has 17 candidates from the following countries:  Antigua, Barbados, Belize, China, Poland, St. Lucia, Armenia, Cameroon, Nigeria, Trinidad/Tobago and Zimbabwe.  Given this diverse population, faculty create many opportunities for candidate interactions through cultural forums and exhibits, educational experiences throughout the academic year.  In addition, diverse sites have been secured for field experiences and placement decisions include specific consideration of diversity-related characteristics. 

Candidates have the opportunity to interact with other candidates from diverse groups through a variety of activities beginning in their freshman year.  One of GSU’s requirements is that all students enrolled from fall 2008 forward must complete 160 service-learning hours, which enhanced candidates’ ability to work with diverse populations. Participation increases candidate exposure to conflict-resolution skills, socioeconomic differences, gender sensitive issues, cultural differences and language differences.  The projects range from building with Habitat for Humanity to taking the leadership role in after-school tutorial programs or teaching international students about the U. S. Constitution.  While engaging in the projects, the learners interact with other learners from different countries, socioeconomic backgrounds, genders, and cultures.  They learn by interacting with their peers and others about diversity issues (Exhibit 4C1-1-4).

Also, proximity of the university to two predominantly white institutions (Louisiana Tech University and The University of Louisiana at Monroe) has provided opportunities for interaction among candidates in the three schools. Candidates interact and work with other candidates and with PK-12 students from diverse ethnic, racial, national, gender, cultural, and socioeconomic groups in their general education and subject specialty disciplines in many of the academic departments of the universities. Initial candidates take courses at Louisiana Tech through the Inter-Institutional Cooperative Program (ICP).  Advanced candidates enrolled in Louisiana Education Consortium programs take courses at all three schools. Several teacher candidates are actively engaged in international student activities which enhance their knowledge, skills and dispositions regarding diverse populations (Exhibit 4C1-1-5). 

4c.2. How diverse are the candidates in initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation programs?

Table 9

4c.3. What efforts does the unit make to recruit and retain candidates from diverse groups?

The College of Education has a Diversity and Multicultural Plan (Exhibit 4C3-1-1) which addresses issues of recruitment and retention.  The Unit makes efforts to recruit and retain diverse candidates through several initiatives. The College makes conscious efforts to recruit other race candidates by working with the University and thus developing community interest, support and participation from all members of the community at large. The unit in cooperation with the university provides campus visitation programs for local and other race students and their parents. The unit also collaborates in a working relationship with teachers, counselors, and administrators in the secondary schools and community colleges in the service area.

The College engages in High School Day activities (http://www.gram.edu/admissions/why/beyond class/high school day/) whereby area schools send high school students and their teachers to the Grambling State University Campus for Visitation. On this day faculty from the College of Education meet with the students and impress upon them the college programs and explain to them the variety of areas of study in which they can pursue their studies.


4c.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to candidate diversity may be attached here.

Table 9

Candidate Demographics

 

Candidates in Initial Teacher Preparation

Programs

n (%)

Candidates in Advanced Preparation Programs

n (%)

All Students in the Institution

n (%)

Diversity of Geographical Area Served by Institution*

(%)

American Indian or Alaska Native

1%

0%

0.2%

 

Asian

1%

0%

0.3%

 

Black or African American, non-

Hispanic

95%

84%

87%

 

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific

Islander

0%

0%

0%

 

Hispanic or Latino

1%

0%

0.3%

 

White, non-Hispanic

1%

10%

3%

 

Two or more races

0%

0%

0%

 

Other

1%

4%

9%

 

Race/ethnicity unknown

0%

2%

0.2%

 

Total

100%

100%

100%

 

Female

58%

68%

62%

 

Male

42%

32%

38%

 

Total

100%

100%

100%

 

*See Table 10

4d. Experiences Working with Diverse Students in P-12 Schools

4d.1. How does the unit ensure that candidates develop and practice knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions related to diversity during their field experiences and clinical practice?


The unit ensures that candidates present themselves as professionals participating in instructional and non-instructional activities both within and outside the immediate classroom environment.  Candidates become familiar with their roles, responsibilities and professional dispositions during the initial Level One field experience by completing observation/ participation assignments which bear diversity elements. This experience allows candidates to understand the demands of teaching and learning in a diverse classroom environment and whether their interests and abilities are consistent with professional demands. They observe diverse classrooms at elementary, middle, and secondary school partners. As they progress through Levels I, II, III, and IV of the field experience enable candidates to apply and reflect on content, professional and pedagogical knowledge, skills and professional dispositions. They identify and observe diverse strategies used in effective teaching as they plan, develop and deliver instruction. Candidates taking ED200, ED300, ED 312, and ED 317 (Exhibit B1-5-1) acquire skills and dispositions which promote professional dispositions and sensitivity to demographic including ethnic/racial, cultural, gender, socioeconomic, linguistic and ability differences. During their tenure, candidates demonstrate their ethical commitment to teaching in participating in microteaching, tutoring, preparation of teaching materials which reflect all students and help all students learn. Courses such as ED 317, and LECF 704  cover academic knowledge , skills and dispositions which ensure that candidates acquire and are sensitive to multicultural isues, as well as exceptioalities, inclusion and global perspectives. Thse course works, field experiences, and clinical practices are designed to help candidates understsnd the influence of culture on education and in the process acquire the ability to develop meaningful learning experiences to help all students. The unit has faculty who come from a range of cultural backgrounds and experiences that guide, build, and enhance understanding of diversity. The unit promotes exemplar cultural ad diversity symposiums, conferences, classroom activities based on the knwledge, skills and professional dispositions attained during field experiences and clinical practice (Exhibit 4D1-1-1).

4d.2. How diverse are the P-12 students in the settings in which candidates participate in field experiences and clinical practice? Please complete Table 10 or upload your own table at Prompt 4d.4 below. [Although NCATE encourages institutions to this enables candidates share their experiences report the data available for each school used for clinical practice, units may not have these data available by school. If the unit uses more than 20 schools for clinical practice, school district data may be substituted for school data in the table below.

Table 10

Demographics on Sites for Clinical Practice in Initial and Advanced Programs

Name of school

American Indian or Alaskan Native

Asian or Pacific Islander

Black, non-Hispanic

Hispanic

White, non-Hispanic

Other

Race/ ethnicity unknown

Students receiving free/reduced price lunch (student socio-economic status)

Arcadia High School

1

 

210

3

32

   

188

Crawford Elementary School

   

345

14

46

   

351

Gibsland-Coleman High School

 

1

262

 

12

   

247

Haughton High School

             

336

Haughton Middle School

9

4

169

 

698

   

404

C.E. Byrd High School

   

840

 

1079

   

650

Cherokee Park Elementary School

   

339

 

2

   

314

Lakeshore Elementary School

   

569

 

2

   

531

Mooretown Elementary Professional Develop. School

   

254

 

1

   

236

Shreve Island Elementary School

2

14

225

 

505

   

229

Keithville Elementary/Middle School

5

3

456

 

632

   

653

Athens High School

   

207

 

28

   

220

Homer Elementary School

 

1

377

 

112

   

434

Homer High School

 

1

240

 

72

   

248

Homer Junior High School

 

3

195

 

68

   

212

Southside Elementary School

   

256

       

337

Jonesboro-Hodge High School

 

3

308

 

166

   

315

Quitman High School

 

2

48

1

490

   

192

A. J. Brown Elementary School

   

245

       

192

Grambling State University Laboratory High School

   

170

       

104

Choudrant High School

   

42

 

335

   

109

Cypress Springs Elementary School

 

9

330

 

47

   

364

Glen View Elementary School

 

4

299

13

283

   

378

Hillcrest Elementary School

1

 

120

 

321

   

167

I.A. Lewis Elementary School

   

184

4

101

   

203

A. E. Phillips Laboratory School

 

1

29

5

228

   

3

Ruston Elementary School

 

2

375

8

33

   

388

Ruston High School

 

16

534

12

565

   

477

Simboro High School

   

267

16

296

   

351

Ruston Junior High school

2

6

359

8

194

   

383

Grambling State University Middle School

   

112

       

83

Choudrant Elementary School

2

 

37

4

391

   

176

Riser Elementary School

   

71

4

281

   

291

Riser Middle School

   

219

11

268

   

428

Swayze Elementary School

   

378

2

5

   

376

West Ouachita High School

1

2

44

9

879

   

271

Richwood high School

 

3

491

 

4

   

426

West Ridge Middle School

 

4

19

5

608

   

158

Good Hope Middle School

 

3

80

5

527

   

165

Carroll High School

   

700

       

569

Berg Jones Elementary School

 

1

367

       

364

Neville High School  

14

480

6

381

   

355

Minnie Ruffin Elementary School    

510

3

     

463

 

4d.3. How does the unit ensure that candidates use feedback from peers and supervisors to reflect on their skills in working with students from diverse groups?

Candidates work with faculty supervisors from the university and cooperating teachers from the school system to assist them in dealing with specific issues that may arise during the student teaching assignment. The candidates work with a school-based cooperating teacher who observes and gives them continuous feedback as they continue their student teaching. Student teachers plan for and address a wide variety of learner needs (social, emotional, physical, and intellectual) through assessment, daily lesson planning, teaching, and evaluation of a variety of learning experiences.  Three formal observations (five for special education candidates) are required for cooperating teachers to rate the teacher candidates’ performance using the LCET standards that address diversity and the unit's diversity outcomes. At the initial level for example, candidates are observed for lesson adaptation to diverse students.  Candidates are expected to display their understanding of how elementary students differ in their development and how to create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse students.  Each formal observation is followed by a conference with the cooperating teacher candidate to share results and offer suggestions for improvement. Finally, candidates must receive an acceptable rating in all domains on the final evaluation.

4d.4. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the diversity of P-12 students in schools in which education candidates do their field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-3) should be uploaded.]

1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 4?

The unit ensures that its candidates participate in a variety of multicultural activities. Among these activities is the College of Education’s Annual Research Symposia (http://www.gram.edu/academics/majors/education/symposium/) which were held during the last three years. The symposia involved faculty in the Unit and other faculty from GSU and several other universities. The first research presentation addressed ‘Research on Cultural Diversity in Education’. The second research symposium particularly focused on the theme: ‘Teaching Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students.’ The third Symposium covered studies focused on ‘Improving Rural Life and Education.’(Exhibit 4O1-1-4). Other diversity-focused conferences coordinated by Curriculum and Instruction faculty as well as collaborative efforts with the LEC doctoral program (Exhibit 4O1-1-2, Exhibit 4O1-1-3) held annually also engage faculty and students in diverse cultural professional development.  Furthermore, the Center for International Affairs and Programs at GSU (Exhibit 4O1-1-4) conducts cultural activities in which college candidates participate in international cultural shows. These projects have had valued contributions to cultural awareness and diversity.  In addition, diversity is infused into numerous activities including but not limited to the LA GEAR UP Summer Learning Camp grant (Exhibit 4O1-1-5; Exhibit 4O1-1-6) the Annual Spring Reading Conference, the Helen Richard Smith Teaching and Learning Symposium, and collaborative projects with community organization such The Links, Inc.’s Annual Cultural Extravaganza.


2. What research related to Standard 4 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?

The unit continuously reviews teacher candidates’ performance on diversity assessment instruments such Dispositions Inventory.  Faculty frequently examine Conceptual Framework strands and seek to improve the program by updating syllabi based on Unit assessment feedback and best practices from the research.  Also, reflections from field and clinical experiences are incorporated in ongoing research activity.  Faculty continuously review results from the “Reconstructing Lives” project to enhance candidate exposure to the many facets of diversity.