NCATE Standard 3 Report


STANDARD 3. FIELD EXPERIENCES AND CLINICAL PRACTICE

The unit and its school partners design, implement, and evaluate field experiences and clinical practice so that teacher candidates and other school professionals develop and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions necessary to help all students learn.

[In this section the unit must include (1) initial and advanced programs for teachers, (2) programs for other school professionals, and (3) off-campus, distance learning, and alternate route programs, noting differences when they exist.]

 

3a. Collaboration between Unit and School Partners

3a.1. Who are the unit's partners in the design, delivery, and evaluation of the unit's field and clinical experiences?

Initial Programs:  Unit partners consist of area PK-12 school districts, university laboratory schools, professional development school partners, and the PK-16+ Council (which consists of partner school personnel, college of arts and science faculty, community partners, and students). The council collaborates in the design and implementation of field and clinical experiences that support candidates’ development of knowledge, skills, and dispositions required to be a successful teacher. The delivery system requires a contract between the university and participating school districts that delineates the state and university required qualifications of cooperating teachers  (Exhibit 3a1.1) and the responsibilities of principals in the assignment and supervision of student teachers and teacher candidates in the schools (Exhibit  3a.1.1). The Director of Office of Professional Laboratory Experiences (OPLE) in consultation with the principal assigns cooperating teachers for student teaching and field experience (Exhibit 3a.1.2, p3).  .  University supervisors are assigned in consultation between the OPLE director and the professional education department heads. Field experience placements are made in consultation with school principals and OPLE. Field experience assignments support course objectives and are determined by the course instructor. The field experiences handbook outlines the procedures and expectations of all participants (Exhibit 3a.1-2-3, p3). School personnel provide feedback on assigned students on the Record of Observation/Participation Experiences Log (3.1.3 p17) and evaluate teacher candidates’ using the Field Experience Student Evaluation form (Exhibit 3a.1-2-3, p17).  University supervisors in consultation with mentors and principals where Teach GSU candidates are employed are also involved in the process.

 Advanced Programs: In our Educational Leaders Level I Master’s Program, the Board of Regents and the LA DOE sponsored several meetings, workshops, and a retreat to develop collaborative university/private provider/district partnerships. Members from the Southern Regional Educational Board (SREB), school district administrators, principals of selected school sites some Ed. Leaders faculty from GSU participated in these efforts funded by the Wallace Foundation. Numerous on-campus meetings were held with various stakeholders and representation from the SREB to evaluate the design, delivery and implementation of the internship experiences. Results of the experiences were recorded on a scoring guide provided by SREB (Exhibit 3a1.4 Scoring Guide for Core Conditions and Indicators of Program Design). In the LEC program, the site supervisor is the key person in the delivery and evaluation of the student’s internship/field experiences (Exhibit B1-2-8 p. 57).        

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3a.2. In what ways have the unit's partners contributed to the design, delivery, and evaluation of the unit's field and clinical experiences?

Ongoing dialogs between the unit and school partners about field experiences/student teaching facilitate continuous refinement in the design, delivery, and evaluation of field/clinical experiences of initial level programs. Placement of student teachers, practitioner teachers, and teacher candidates is accomplished through consistent communication between the OPLE office and the principal or a designated administrator. This process fosters effective placements and improvement. Feedback from cooperating teachers/ principals is used to revise practices. A rating form used to provide an analysis of participants’ performances in the field is one change resulting from this dialog (Exhibit B-1-2-3 p. 17). Grades are assigned by university instructors for the assigned field experiences. Reciprocal evaluations between student teachers, university supervisors and cooperating teachers, provide a comprehensive assessment of all participants in clinical experiences. Collaboration between the Unit and GSU laboratory schools is instrumental in the growth and refinement of field/clinical experiences. The Field Experiences Committee composed of unit faculty, PDS faculty, Arts and Sciences faculty, and Laboratory School faculty serves as an advisory council for changes in design, delivery, and evaluation. Recommended changes are submitted to the C&I Department for review and approval. The C&I department head initiates the appropriate change process. A recent change resulting from this process is the implementation of a common rubric for initial level field experiences that will be used to grade field experience (all levels) assignments in all courses. Use of this rubric (Exhibit 3a2.2) that was implemented spring 2010 is expected to improve evaluation of all levels of field experiences lead to more effective identification of opportunities for improvement.

Contributions from the Wallace Foundation and the BOR assisted the Educational Leaders program through a series of workshops that provided open communication regarding the effective delivery of field experiences. The Field Experiences Committee is the major partner in the design, delivery, and evaluation of and implementation of field experiences. A representative from SREB assisted with evaluating the programs’ design, content, and delivery. LEA administrators and principals participate in collaborative agreements that provide candidates with meaningful field experiences as they are mentored by effective leaders. On-going data for improving the internship/field experiences is also provided by central administrators and principals. (Exhibit 3a 2.3).The LEC Board formed a committee of site supervisors and university faculty to develop rubrics for the evaluation of field experiences at various sites (Exhibit 3a2.4, p 55; and p. 56).

 

3a.3. What are the roles of the unit and its school partners in determining how and where candidates are placed for field experiences, student teaching, and internships?

 


 OPLE, in consultation with principals and unit faculty, facilitates appropriate placements for candidates’ field experiences (Exhibit 3a.3.1). Faculty submit field experience projects and a class roll to OPLE. The director consults with school principals to identify appropriate school faculty to work with each candidate (Exhibit 3a.-3-2). OPLE maintains a record of field experiences and student teaching placements to ensure each candidate has experiences in a variety of settings (Exhibit 3a.3.3). Other factors considered in the placement of candidates are diversity of experiences, diverse populations in school site, classroom teacher and grade levels, and hardship (Exhibit B1-2-4, pp27-29). OPLE requests placement through the principal who identifies a class and teacher appropriate for the assignment. Cooperating teachers facilitate completion of assignments and an evaluation of the candidate’s on-site behavior. The university instructor assigns a grade for the field experience. OPLE compiles and maintains data from the cooperating teachers’ evaluations of students’ performances. Because of insufficient return of useable evaluation forms, OPLE recommended and professional education departments approved a rubric that included completed evaluations as part of the field experience grade. Use of the rubric was implemented spring 2010.  Placement of Teach GSU candidates is initiated by the respective school system and candidate who is an employee of that system.  These candidates are given field experience assignments in all required courses.

Student teaching assignments are made by OPLE.  Principals recommend cooperating teachers who meet requirements (3a3.7). The professional education department heads assign university supervisors by candidates’ certification area. University supervisors and cooperating teachers evaluate student teachers 3-5 times per semester using a rubric (3a.3.8) to evaluate mastery of all components of all domains of the Louisiana Components of Effective Teaching (LCET). This instrument is aligned with the CF/SPA standards. Teach GSU candidates are evaluated by the university supervisor.

Within the Ed. Leaders Level I Master’s program, the candidates and the faculty meet to decide the appropriate internship sites for students’ experiences (Exhibit B1-2-8, p51). Faculty schedule meetings with district personnel and/or the school principal to discuss and coordinate the internship experiences (Exhibit 3a3.9). The LEC candidate, the major professor and the approved on-site supervisor mutually decide on the internship site. An Internship Professional Development Plan is completed by the candidate and signed by the student and major professor (Exhibit B1-2-8, p52). An Internship Site Supervisor Agreement Form is also completed by the student, with signatures from the site supervisor and major professor (Exhibit 3a3.11 p. 52,).

 

3a.4. How do the unit and its school partners share expertise and resources to support candidates' learning in field experiences and clinical practice?

Resource and expertise sharing between the unit and its school partners is continuous. Candidates continuously observe, evaluate and assist during field/clinical experiences and provide after school tutorial sessions for students. OPLE facilitates workshops for cooperating teachers and university supervisors that address topics for enhancing the teaching/learning experiences (Exhibit 3a.4.1). Faculty facilitate professional development opportunities in partner schools and faculty from PK-12 schools participate in on-campus faculty development activities (Exhibit 3a4.2). All participating stakeholders have access to share school-based and university-based resources. For example, a laboratory secured through Title III funding for strengthening skills in the use of technology in the teaching learning process is available to faculty and teachers in partner schools. Teacher candidates participate in partner school-based professional development activities.

  Faculty in the Ed. Leaders Level I program conduct regular site visits to observe, document, discuss and participate in various internship activities. On-going communication takes place between the site supervisor and university faculty members. Workshops are conducted for site supervisors and meetings take place with participating school districts to discuss details about the internship experiences. Principals are provided a letter delineating expectations of the candidates’ experiences. LEC site supervisor observes, evaluates and assists in the evaluation of the student’s internship experiences (Exhibit B1-2-8, p. 57). Doctoral candidates in clinical practice produce a portfolio that documents their professional development workshops, curriculum development involvement and their participation in grant writing of special projects for the school system.

 


3a.5. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to collaboration between unit and school partners may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

3b. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of Field Experiences and Clinical Practice

3b.1. What are the entry and exit requirements for clinical practice?

   Candidates in initial degree programs must complete all  required courses with a minimum grade of C, demonstrate dispositions appropriate to teaching, achieve the required scores on specified PRAXIS examinations, have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above, and complete a minimum of 180 observation/participation hours to be admitted to student teaching (Exhibit 3b1.1). Teach GSU candidates must have an undergraduate degree with a minimum 2.5 grade point average, have taken and passed all PRAXIS 1 examinations, PRAXIS 2 content examination, and successfully complete the interview. To exit, candidates must submit passing scores on Praxis II examinations required for area of certification, document 180 teaching hours and complete a minimum of 270 hours student teaching (Exhibit 3b1.2). Candidates must also be rated 2 or above on all elements in the student teaching evaluation by the cooperating teacher and the university supervisor. Teach GSU candidates must successfully complete all coursework including the field experiences associated with on-campus courses, achieve a passing score on the PRAXIS II Principles of Learning and Teaching examination and receive passing scores on LaTAAP to exit the program.

Educational Leadership Level I Master’s candidates are required to complete a minimum of 135 hours of field experiences (Exhibit 3b1.3 and 3b1.4). The candidates gather portfolio materials as part of their culminating assignment. In the formal internship class, candidates must also complete 30 clock hours of internship experiences. In order to exit, candidates must complete and present an electronic portfolio to university faculty, site supervisors and students.

To participate in the internship, LEC candidates must complete the coursework outlined in the degree program and successfully pass the comprehensive exam. A rubric is used to evaluate each candidate’s performance (Exhibit B1-2-8. p. 48). Candidates exit the program when 200 clock hours and a portfolio are completed. The supervisor signs the appropriate evaluation verifying satisfactory performance. Rubrics are used for both the internship and the portfolio to evaluate performance (Exhibit B1-2-8, p. 55 and LEC Residency Portfolio Rubric, p.46: LEC Handbook) 

 


3b.2. What field experiences are required for each program or categories of programs (e.g., secondary) at both the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels, including graduate programs for licensed teachers and other school professionals? What clinical practice is required for each program or categories of programs in initial teacher preparation programs and programs for the preparation of other school professionals? Please complete Table 7 or upload your own table at Prompt 3b.9 below.

Table 7

Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program

Program

Field Experiences

Student Teaching

Or

Internship

Total # of Hours

Art Education

Level 1 – 30 hours

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

740

K-12

Level 2 – 65 hours

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 50 hours

 
 

Level 4-  35 hours

 
 

Total         180 hours

 

Biology Education

Level 1 – 30 hours

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

740

K-12

Level 2 – 45 hours

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 50 hours

 
 

Level 4    60

Total       180

 
     

Early Childhood Ed.

Level 1 – 15

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

755

Pre-K -3

Level 2 – 75

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 105

 
 

Total = 195

 
     

Elementary Education

Level 1 – 30

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

753

1-5

Level 2 – 103

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 60

 
 

Total = 193

 
     

English Education

Level 1 – 25

Full Semester (16 weeks) =  560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

740

K-12

Level 2 – 60

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 50

 
 

Level 4    45

 
 

Total=      180

 

HPE

Level 1 – 30

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

740

K-12

Level 2 – 45

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 50

 
 

Level 4    55

 
 

Total=       180

 

Mathematics

Level 1 – 30

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

740

K-12

Level 2 – 60

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 50

 
 

Level 4-  40

 
 

Total=      180

 

Music Education (Inst)

Level 1 – 30

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

740

K-12

Level 2 – 35

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 50

 
 

Level 4    65

 

Music Education (Voc)

Level 1 – 30

740

K-12

Level 2 – 45

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 50

 
 

Level 4= 55

 
 

Total=      180

   

Social Studies Ed.

Level 1 – 30

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

740

K-12

Level 2 – 60

 

BS Initial

Level 3 – 50

 
 

Level 4   40

 
 

Total=       180

 

Special Education

Level 1 – 25

Full Semester (16 weeks) = 560 hours with a minimum of 180 teaching hours

740

Elementary

Level 2 – 45

 

Mild/Moderate Dual

Level 3 – 60

 
 

Level 4    50

 

Special Education

Level 1 – 25

740

Secondary

Level 2 – 45

 

Mild/Moderate Dual

Level 3 – 50

 
 

Level 4   60

 
 

Total=180

 

Teach GSU

(Alternate Certification)

     

Special Education

  100 course related hours

100 Course related hours

ED 451-Internship as teacher of record in K-12 setting supported by university faculty, principal, and cooperating teacher (mentor)

 

Elementary

Initial Certification

 

Elementary

1-6

Initial Certification

ELCC Educational Leadership

A minimum of 50 hours of course specific practicum experiences before registering for capstone practicum

Masters program = 12 courses. Students participate/engage in a series of projects in multiple field experiences at a single site over a prolonged period

Total minimum of

135 hours

250

LEC Program

Students are eligible for internship after successful completion of the Comprehensive Examination

Internship Seminar = 3 semester hours. A total of 200 hours at the internship placement site is required and an additional 50 hours of service initiatives. Internship = 3 semester hours of which 50 hours of seminar is required

M.Ed. Curriculum and Instruction

148 course related hours

 

               148

 

3b.3How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates develop proficiencies outlined in the unit's conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards through field and clinical experiences in initial and advanced preparation programs?

  Field experiences for each course in the initial level programs are included in the state approved course design. Field Experience assignments are designed to meet specific course objectives aligned with Louisiana Components of Effective Teaching (LCET), applicable SPA standards, and the unit’s conceptual framework (Exhibit B1-2-4 pp27-29). Field Experience assignments range from observation and limited participation in early courses to assuming responsibility for the full teaching load during student teaching (Exhibit B1-2-4 pp 16-19). OPLE collaborates with course instructors and school personnel to place students in an optimum environment for acquiring desired knowledge and skills. Course instructors include field experience performance in the grade for the course. Cooperating teachers evaluate the teacher candidates assigned to them using an evaluation form provided by the university (Exhibit 3b3.2).  Instruments used for assessment of candidates’ performance during field/clinical experience components align to the applicable standards. University supervisors evaluate practitioner teachers using the instrument based on

LCET standards, aligned to the unit’s conceptual framework and the standards of the applicable SPA. Culminating projects in the clinical experience are designed to measure impact on student learning, reflection, technology integration skills as well as candidates’ ability to differentiate instruction and to develop plans to meet the needs of all students represented in the assigned classes. Teach GSU candidates complete the LaTAAP portfolio, which is assessed using the LCET rubric.

In the Ed. Leaders Level I Master’s program, candidates keep a log of their experiences and are required to secure signatures from the site supervisor and faculty member upon completion of the activity. Artifacts and class assignments are presented and evaluated within the program that are aligned with the unit’s program goals and objectives, the conceptual framework, state and professional standards. This is reflected in all syllabi in the Educational Leaders Level I Master’s program (Exhibit 3b3.3). Internship logs, rubrics and portfolios are reviewed by the major professors and program directors in the LEC program.     

 

3b.4. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates use technology as an instructional tool during field experiences and clinical practice?

  The use of available technology as an instructional tool is consistently modeled by faculty in initial level programs. Recognizing the need for increased access to educative technology, the director of OPLE secured a Title III grant (Exhibit 3b4.1) to equip a classroom with technology and software to increase faculty and candidates’ skills. The Certification Support Specialist and the Technology Assistant work with individual and small groups of candidates to enhance technology use skills (Exhibit 3b4.2). Methods classes are assigned to this classroom to provide hands on experiences in the use of instructional technology (Exhibit 3b4.3). Field assignments in courses require candidates to observe and when permitted participate in the cooperating teacher’s use of technology.  Upper level courses require candidates to infuse technology into the instructional process. For example, field experience assignments for ED402-Instructional Technology Integration require teacher candidates to consult with the cooperating teacher to design and teach a technology infused lesson (Exhibit 3b4.4). Student performance on the technology-infused lesson is a component of the course evaluation.  Student teachers’ expertise in the use of technology has been strengthened by the increased use of technology in the schools in the area.  Student teachers and interns are evaluated by their university supervisors and cooperating teachers on their use of technology as an instructional tool using item IIIA5 on the Teacher Candidate/Intern Evaluation instrument. Candidates are consistently rated 3-4 on a four point rating scale. Student teachers submitted electronic portfolios fall semester 2009 (3b4.3). A team of raters external to the university rated all of the student teachers three or above on a rubric using a four point rating scale.

Candidates in the M. Ed program use available technology in the teaching/learning process as they complete their field experiences.  Candidates in the Educational Leaders Level I Master’s program must develop an electronic portfolio as a requirement before the completion of the program. Various internship activities require that candidates use technology (Exhibit 3b4.5 Sample student portfolios). Candidates in the LEC program also use technology during the internship experiences and for coursework assignments (Exhibit 3b 4. 6).

 

3b.5. What criteria are used in the selection of school-based clinical faculty? How are the criteria implemented? What evidence suggests that school-based clinical faculty members are accomplished school professionals?

In the initial programs the director of OPLE facilitates the selection of school-based clinical faculty in cooperation with school principals and based on criteria stated in the annual agreement between GSU and selected school districts. The director provides the principal with biographical information and the certification area of the candidate (Exhibit 3.5.1.). Using that information, the principal recommends a cooperating teacher with the required credentials (Exhibit 3.5.2), is an effective mentor, has demonstrated outstanding teaching and learning practices, and seems compatible based on the candidate’s biographical data. Teach GSU candidates are assigned a trained mentor and are monitored by the university supervisor.

For the on-going field-based experiences in the Ed. Leaders Level I Master’s program, the supervisor must be a certified principal and willing to participate (Exhibit 3b.5.3).

In the LEC program, the supervisor must have at least a master’s degree and serve in an administrative role in a school setting as well as agree to participate.

 

3b.6. What preparation do school-based faculty members receive for their roles as clinical supervisors?

Workshops for university supervisors and new school-based clinical faculty are offered each semester for the initial programs (Exhibit 3b.6.1). All clinical personnel are provided a packet that contains handbooks, forms, directions for accessing on-line materials and other semester-only information. The strengthening of technology integration for school-based clinical faculty is supported through access to the on-campus SMART classroom (Exhibit 3b6.2). This room provides access to professional development resources as well as equipment for use by student teachers (Exhibit 3b.6.3) and cooperating teachers.

The Louisiana Leadership Excellence through Administrative Development (LaLEAD) of the BOR and the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) offer leadership meetings and training workshops for partners in the Ed. Leaders Level I Master’s program. Faculty members in the Educational Leadership program attended training meetings on 6/20/08; 3/20/09 and 11/18/09 in Baton Rouge, LA to gain additional knowledge on the role of departmental faculty, supervisors, etc. in internship experiences (Exhibit 3b 6.4 ). In the LEC program, faculty and on-site supervisors participate in-service orientation sessions and are advised of the standards of performance and requirements expected of LEC candidates. The field experiences/internship requirements are located in the LEC Handbook (Exhibit 3b6.5, p. 53).

 


3b.7. What evidence demonstrates that clinical faculty members provide regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs, and other school professionals?

Initial program clinical faculty members submit three to five evaluation reports for the assigned student teacher (Exhibit 3b7.1). These reports follow pre-teaching conferences, observations of lessons taught, and post observation conference. Cooperating teachers also monitor and sign weekly attendance/activity logs (Exhibit 3b7.2) that student teachers submit to the OPLE office weekly. Student teachers are required to submit lesson plans to the cooperating teacher the week prior to teaching for feedback from cooperating teachers prior to teaching the lesson(s). To strengthen this element, fall 2009 student teachers are submitting weekly goal sheets signed by the cooperating teacher. The following procedures ensure regular and continuous support for student teachers: 1) Student teachers are consistently evaluated by cooperating teachers and university supervisors (Exhibit3b7.3), 2) regular conferences among the student teacher, the cooperating teacher, and the university supervisor (Exhibit 3b.7.4), and 3) scheduled on-campus seminars (Exhibit 3b7.5).

M, Ed. Curriculum and Instruction candidates enroll in a teaching strategies seminar where they demonstrate their expertise as an agent of change by developing and implementing a plan for a total school environment that involves all school stakeholders in school improvement.  The course instructor and a school-based mentor assist and evaluate the candidate in this endeavor.   In the Educational Leaders Level I Master’s program, candidates keep a log of their participation. Continuous feedback is provided to candidates; logs are reviewed and discussed with program faculty and each student (Exhibit 3b7.6). The LEC program directors provide initial advising to LEC candidates. After candidates are admitted, faculty assume advising duties.

 


3b.8. What structured activities involving the analysis of data and current research are required in programs for other school professionals?

Candidates in the M. Ed.  Curriculum and Instruction program use current research in the development of the plan for a model learning environment in the ED 580 Teaching Strategies Seminar.   Many courses in the program include objectives that require data analysis and use of  current research findings. Candidates in the Educational Leaders Master’s I program are required to take a variety of classes related to data analysis, to include the following: EDLD 502-Using Data in Instructional Leadership; ED 506-Instructional Improvement and Assessment; EDLD507-Using Research to Lead Change; EDLD 509-Evaluating Program Effectiveness, and EDLD 511 and 512-Capstone Project: Problems and Issues in Education. Class assignments require analyzing and reporting current research, issues, and trends.  A capstone project (research proposal) is also required where candidates collect and analyze data related to a specific school problem (Exhibit 3b8.1 EDLD 512Capstone Proposal and 3b8.2 Capstone Rubric).  Candidates are required to gather and analyze data for the completion of the doctoral dissertation in the LEC program. Candidates continuously submit drafts of the dissertation to the major professor and committee members for review and feedback.

 


3b.9. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the design, implementation, and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

 

3c. Candidates’ Development and Demonstration of Knowledge, Skills, and Professional Dispositions to Help All Students Learn

3c.1. On average, how many candidates are eligible for clinical practice each semester or year? What percent, on average, complete clinical practice successfully?

In the initial programs, based on data from fall 2005 to spring 2009 the average number of teacher candidates meeting requirements for admission to student teaching each semester is eleven. On average, 91% complete clinical practice successfully. The 9% that do not complete successfully have failed a PRAXIS exam that is a requirement for completing student teaching and 80-100% achieved the required score the next semester.

  The average in the Educational Leaders Level I Master’s program is 20-25 who enter an internship practicum and 100% successfully complete the experience. In the LEC program, approximately 3 doctoral candidates successfully complete the internship each year.  The M.Ed. in Curriculum and instruction is a new program.  The first cohort entered fall 2009.

 

3c.2. What are the roles of candidates, university supervisors, and school-based faculty in assessing candidate performance and reviewing the results during clinical practice?

  Student teachers are required to maintain a developmental portfolio that is reviewed regularly by the university supervisor and the cooperating teacher. These portfolios contain work products such as lesson plans, professional development activities, reflections, and work products used and/or generated while student teaching. Candidates are expected to have increased responsibility for classes until they have assumed the complete workload (Exhibit 3c2.1). Cooperating teachers mentor student teachers on a daily basis and guide them in refining teaching and management skills (Exhibit 3c2.2). Weekly conferences and goal setting between the student teacher and the cooperating teacher ensure continuing communication and growth. University supervisors work with cooperating teachers and student teachers to facilitate continuing development of skills and serve as a resource for student teachers and cooperating teachers. University supervisors and cooperating teachers team to optimize growth of the student teacher. Principals monitor the experience and provide assistance and intervention when needed. University supervisors and cooperating teachers conduct three to five formal evaluations of each student teacher’ performance in the classroom. Teacher evaluations are followed by a conference between the cooperating teacher and student teacher and sometimes the principal. University supervisor evaluations are followed by a conference between the university supervisor, the cooperating teacher, and the student teacher to review the evaluation and to develop an improvement plan if needed.  Teach GSU prepare a professional portfolio that is reviewed by the university supervisor and evaluated through the LaTAAP assessment process.

In the Educational Leaders Level I Master’s program, the on-site supervisor and university faculty evaluate the performance of candidates in the internship and field experiences. A formal record of experience form is kept by each candidate as they participate in various activities. The site supervisor and the faculty member must sign the form as documentation of the completed activities (Exhibit 3c2.3).

The site supervisor and the university faculty use rubrics to assess performance in the LEC program (Exhibit 3c2.4 pp 45, 55, 56, 57). The M.Ed. in C&I requires candidates to present a culminating project.  The course instructor uses a rubric to rate the assignment that is reviewed by the department head.

 


3c.3. How is time for reflection and feedback from peers and clinical faculty incorporated into field experiences and clinical practice?

In the initial programs, feedback and reflections from peers and instructors occur in the courses requiring field experiences. The syllabi for courses requiring field experiences include activities to be completed during the field experience. Opportunities for sharing feedback and reflections are addressed in the course design. University supervisors visit student teachers on-site, confer with the student teacher and cooperating teacher, review the developmental portfolio, and observe and evaluate the student teacher (Exhibit 3c3.1). A follow-up conference with the student teacher and the cooperating teacher is an integral part of the visit. Student teachers attend a series of one day seminars during the semester. Seminar activities are designed to support work at the school site (Exhibit 3c3.2). Student teachers maintain daily reflections in their developmental portfolios that are reviewed by the cooperating teacher, the university supervisor, and the principal, when requested. Periodic seminars for student teachers during the semester provide opportunities for sharing experiences and receiving feedback from peers and university faculty. Selected reflections from developmental portfolios are shared in these sessions.

The Ed. Leaders Level I Master’s program includes several means of reflection and feedback  incorporated in the course design, to include: 1)through candidates composing in their reflection journals in some courses in the program,2) by completing administrative relative projects assigned by their principal during the two year program, and 3) when faculty visit candidates at the school sites.

 


3c.4. What data from multiple assessments provide evidence that candidates demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn in field experiences and clinical practice?

 Candidates in all initial level programs demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions for helping students learn. The grade that the candidate receives for the field experience in each course is one assessment used. Grading criteria for field experience assignments include criteria that address content knowledge and skills. Items on the host teachers’ evaluation of the candidate address knowledge, skills, and dispositions with assessment of dispositions being most prominent. Field experience assignments in all courses are included in the course design and are a part of the final course grades. Three projects completed during student teaching provide summative data for evaluating candidates’ proficiencies:  1) Observations by cooperating teacher and university supervisor (Exhibit 3c4.1),  2) Impact on Student Learning Project (Exhibit 3c4.2), and 3) Presentation of Professional Portfolio (Exhibit 3c4.3).  Student mean scores on these projects are consistently 3.0 or above on a four point scale.  

Data on the Ed. Leaders Level I Master’s program is provided through rubrics, the field experience log form, portfolios and class presentations to document knowledge, skills, and dispositions. Rubrics  are used in the LEC program to evaluate the portfolios that candidates submit (Exhibit 3c4.6, pp 55 and 56 of the LEC Handbook). Additionally, data is collected in the LECI 776 course and evaluated by the instructor teaching the course. A grade of “P” for passing, “F” for failure or “NC” for no credit is assigned to a student at the end of the course.

 

3c.5. What process is used to ensure that candidates collect and analyze data on student learning, reflect on those data, and improve student learning during clinical practice?

  Student teachers in initial programs are required to plan and teach a three week unit and develop a presentation that includes alignment of unit objectives with test items, conduct a pre test and adjust the unit plan based on test results, teach the unit, administer a posttest and calculate the level of increase in student learning. Student teachers use results to reflect on their teaching and its impact on student learning (Exhibit 3c5.1). 

 The Impact on Student Learning project demonstrates teacher candidates’ ability to help all students learn. Candidates teach a unit following specific guidelines and calculate group and individual student growth.  Comparisons of pre and post test scores demonstrate levels of students’   growth during the teaching of the unit. Other measures of teacher candidates’ skills in helping all students learn are Items 1-5 of Domain I, Component A and Domain III, Component C of the Teacher Candidate evaluation. Teach GSU candidates are required to include a similar project in their portfolio for LaTAAP assessment.

Field experiences consistent with course goals and objectives are required in all courses for candidates in the M.ED in Curriculum and Instruction program.  Field experiences and classroom experiences provide opportunities to participate in developing approaches for enhancing student learning.  The field experience is on-going throughout the two year Educational Leaders Level I Master’s program. Courses within the program allow candidates to analyze data and respond to specific problems within the school. Additionally, some courses allow candidates to collect and analyze data and use the results to improve school environment. An Internship Proposal is the culminating (capstone) course requirement in EDLD 512(Exhibit 3c5.2). The LEC program requires candidates to design, conduct and interpret qualitative and quantitative research and implement results in school settings. The activities are reflected in the LEC course syllabi throughout the program.

 

3c.6. How does the unit ensure that all candidates have field experiences or clinical practice that includes students with exceptionalities and students from diverse ethnic/racial, linguistic, gender, and socioeconomic groups?

For initial level programs, the OPLE director uses a chart of area schools that includes levels of diversity represented in the school to make assignments for field experiences and student teaching (Exhibit 3c6.1). This process assures exposure of all teacher candidates to levels of diversity represented in the area. Assignments in specific courses and planning and executing lessons during student teaching require all candidates to plan for exceptionalities represented in the assigned setting. In addition to field experiences associated with courses, teachers in the Teach GSU program experience diversity consistent with levels of diversity in the area they are employed and plan lessons that enhance their students’ knowledge and appreciation of diversity and the  contributions of diverse groups in our society.

 Candidates in the M.ED program complete course assignments requiring interactions in school environments to create plans for meeting the needs of all students.  As practicing educators, they are also involved in assessing their own practices in relation to the diverse students in their classrooms. University faculty in the Educational Leaders Level I Master’s program examine School Improvement Plans (SIP) in various districts and for each site chosen that candidates conduct their field experiences and internships. The plan indicates subgroups, to include the educational disadvantaged, race, gender, exceptionalities, etc. Candidates conduct on-going activities within the school and surrounding schools to ensure that a variety of subgroups are included.  In the LEC program, candidates are expected to plan and implement curriculum and instruction for various teaching learning styles, race, ethnicity, gender, social class and other exceptionalities.

 

3c.7. (Optional Upload for Online IR) Tables, figures, and a list of links to key exhibits related to the development and demonstration of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions for helping all students learn may be attached here. [Because BOE members should be able to access many exhibits electronically, a limited number of attachments (0-5) should be uploaded.]

Optional

1. What does your unit do particularly well related to Standard 3?

The unit is very inclusive in having a broad base of participants involved in the development, implementation and evaluation of field experiences.  The field experiences in the unit are grounded in the use of assessment data for making program improvements.  Students are at the center of a triangulated analysis of data and the unit does a good job of using multiple measures to determine the efficacy of students’ field/clinical experiences.  The use of data enables the unit and its partners to be proactive in identifying and resolving deficits in candidates’ knowledge, skills and disposition so that when they complete their program they will be effective in the classroom.

 


2. What research related to Standard 3 is being conducted by the unit or its faculty?

Decreasing numbers of teacher candidates applying for clinical practice is a serious concern.  Data indicated that student progress in the program was impeded by low passage rates on the PRAXIS 1 examinations.  In addition, most students were not attempting to take the required examination until the second semester of the sophomore year.  The OPLE office secured a  Title III grant to implement initiatives to increase the numbers of declared majors passing PRAXIS 1 by the first semester of the sophomore year.  Twenty declared majors in their second or third semester who have completed the English and Mathematics general education requirements successfully, have a 2.8 or above grade point average, and an entering ACT or SAT equivalent score of 16 or above are being selected and sponsored in taking the PRAXIS I examinations.   The test results for these students will be analyzed to develop a profile of declared education majors who meet the PRAXIS 1 requirements.